Initiatives and Referenda Cleared for Circulation

The Attorney General prepares a circulating title and summary of the chief purpose and points of a proposed initiative measure. Proposed initiative measures are cleared for circulation on the day the circulating title and summary is sent to the initiative proponent(s). No petition may be circulated for signatures before it has been cleared to do so by the Attorney General.

Please note: Counties have 8 working days after a proposed initiative measure's circulation deadline (Elections Code section 9030(b)) to notify the Secretary of State's Office if any petition signatures were received. If no signatures are submitted, a proposed initiative measure will fail on the 9th working day after its circulation deadline.

  

 

1863. (19-0002)
LIMITS DURATION OF SPOUSAL SUPPORT AFTER DIVORCE OR LEGAL SEPARATION TO NO MORE THAN FIVE YEARS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.
 
Summary Date: 08/06/19 | Circulation Deadline: 02/03/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Steve Clark

Prohibits courts from ordering spousal support payments lasting longer than five years after a divorce or legal separation. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown net effect on state court costs related to future divorce and legal separation proceedings. (19-0002.)

1864. (19-0003)
CHANGES REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFERRING PROPERTY TAX BASE TO REPLACEMENT PROPERTY. EXPANDS BUSINESS PROPERTY REASSESSMENT. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.
 
Summary Date: 09/06/19 | Circulation Deadline: 03/04/20 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Alexander E. Creel

Removes the following requirements to transfer property tax base to replacement residence for homeowners over 55 or severely disabled: that replacement property be of equal or lesser value; that replacement property be in eligible county; and that transfer occur only once. Allows three such transfers. Removes location and replacement-value requirements for transfers of contaminated or disaster-destroyed property. Adjusts replacement property’s tax base, based on market value. Limits tax benefits for certain transfers between family members. Expands circumstances requiring business property reassessment. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Local governments could gain tens of millions of dollars of property tax revenue per year, likely growing over time to a few hundred million dollars per year. Schools could receive similar property tax revenue gains. Other local and state revenues each could increase by tens of millions of dollars per year. County property tax administration costs likely would increase by tens of millions of dollars per year. (19-0003.)

1865. (19-0004)
CHANGES REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSFERRING PROPERTY TAX BASE TO REPLACEMENT PROPERTY. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.
 
Summary Date: 09/06/19 | Circulation Deadline: 03/04/20 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Alexander E. Creel

Removes the following requirements to transfer property tax base to replacement residence for homeowners over 55 or severely disabled: that replacement property be of equal or lesser value; that replacement property be in eligible county; and that transfer occur only once. Allows three such transfers. Removes location and replacement-value requirements for transfers of contaminated or disaster-destroyed property. Adjusts replacement property’s tax base, based on market value. Eliminates tax benefits for certain transfers between family members. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Local governments could gain tens of millions of dollars of property tax revenue per year, likely growing over time to several hundred million dollars per year. Schools could receive similar property tax revenue gains. Other local and state revenues each could increase by tens of millions of dollars per year. County property tax administration costs likely would increase by tens of millions of dollars per year. (19-0004.)

1866. (19-0005)
AUTHORIZES BONDS TO FUND PROJECTS FOR WILDFIRE PREVENTION, SAFE DRINKING WATER, AND PROTECTING WILDLIFE AND LANDS FROM CLIMATE RISKS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.
 
Summary Date: 09/06/19 | Circulation Deadline: 03/04/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Joseph Caves

Authorizes $7.883 billion in state general obligation bonds for various projects to mitigate climate risks and impacts in the following categories: $3.508 billion for wildfire prevention and community resilience; $2.2 billion for safe drinking water; $975 million for fish and wildlife; $770 million for coastal lands, bays, and oceans; $200 million for agricultural lands; and $230 million for workforce development and education regarding these issues. Appropriates money from General Fund to pay off bonds. Generally prioritizes projects benefitting disadvantaged communities. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: State costs of $15.4 billion to pay off principal ($7.9 billion) and interest ($7.5 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $385 million. Some amount of state and local government savings possible based on to the degree to which bond-funded activities reduce future fire or flood damages (and associated state and local costs) that would otherwise have occurred. Potential savings to local governments, primarily for fire protection and water supply projects, averaging in the low tens of millions of dollars annually over the next few decades. (19-0005.)

1867. (19-0006A1)
REQUIRES MONETARY BAIL. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT. 
 
Summary Date: 09/19/19 | Circulation Deadline: 03/17/20 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Thomas W. Hiltachk

Amends state Constitution to require that monetary bail be included as a means to obtain release from jail before trial, except when arrested for specified crimes excluded under current law (i.e., capital crimes, certain felonies involving violence, sexual assault, or threat of great bodily harm). Amends state Constitution to add definition of “bail” as cash, state or federal bonds, real property, or bond posted by a licensed bail agent on behalf of a licensed surety company. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: If voters uphold the state’s pending pretrial release process, unknown net fiscal effect on state and local governments related to changes in pretrial release proceedings and the supervision of released individuals. Likely reduction in local government costs, that could reach the low tens of millions of dollars annually, from a reduction in the number of individuals or amount of time they spend detained in county jail prior to trial. If voters reject the state’s pending pretrial release process, unknown fiscal effect on state and local governments. Fiscal effect would depend on whether the Legislature chooses to establish a new pretrial release process as authorized by this measure and how such a process would function, as well as whether the Legislature could have otherwise established such a process under preexisting authority. (19-0006.)

1870. (19-0008A1)
INCREASES FUNDING FOR PUBLIC SCHOOLS, COMMUNITY COLLEGES, AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT SERVICES BY CHANGING TAX ASSESSMENT OF COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT. 
Summary Date: 10/17/19 | Circulation Deadline: 04/14/20 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Anthony Thigpenn, Benjamin McBride, Carol Moon Goldberg

Increases funding for K-12 public schools, community colleges, and local governments by requiring that commercial and industrial real property be taxed based on current market value. Exempts from this change: residential properties; agricultural properties; and owners of commercial and industrial properties with combined value of $3 million or less. Increased education funding will supplement existing school funding guarantees. Exempts small businesses from personal property tax; for other businesses, exempts $500,000 worth of personal property. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Net increase in annual property tax revenues of $7.5 billion to $12 billion in most years, depending on the strength of real estate markets. After backfilling state income tax losses related to the measure and paying for county administrative costs, the remaining $6.5 billion to $11.5 billion would be allocated to schools (40 percent) and other local governments (60 percent). (19-0008A1.)

1871. (19-0009)
AUTHORIZES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE GATHERING FOR INITIATIVE, REFERENDUM, AND RECALL PETITIONS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 10/23/19 | Circulation Deadline: 04/20/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Michael Freeman Liddell

Requires Secretary of State to develop a system that allows voters to view state and local initiative, referendum, and recall petitions on Secretary of State’s website and to sign them electronically directly on the website, or to download, print, and sign the printed petitions. Requires Secretary of State or local elections official to verify these signatures. Requires Secretary of State to invite arguments for and against petitions, and to post submitted arguments on website. Requires Secretary of State’s website to include ongoing tally of each measure’s signatures received electronically or on downloaded petitions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time state and local government costs in the millions of dollars or more to develop an online system for electronic petition signature gathering. Potential net costs or savings due to changed state and local government processes for verifying petition signatures. (19-0009.)

1872. (19-00010)
EXPANDS LEGALIZATION OF CANNABIS AND HEMP. INITIATIVE STATUTE.
Summary Date: 10/23/19 | Circulation Deadline: 04/20/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Berton Duzy, Michael Jolson

Repeals existing conflicting laws regulating cultivation, sale, and use of cannabis and hemp. Legalizes cannabis and hemp, as defined. Expands judicial relief, including release from custody, for existing cannabis/hemp convictions. Prohibits permit, license, and tax requirements for personal uses; increases amount allowed for personal use. Prohibits commercial regulation beyond manner applicable to beer/wine; limits retail tax to 10%. Allows doctors to recommend cannabis without prescription; prohibits taxation of medicinal cannabis. Limits cannabis testing for employment or insurance purposes. Bars state or local aid to enforce federal cannabis/hemp laws. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Reduced state and local tax revenues related to the production and sale of cannabis, likely in the mid-to-high hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Reduced state and local license fee revenue – likely in excess of $100 million annually – which could result in some of the regulatory costs being supported from other fund sources (such as the state General Fund). (19-0010.)

1873. (19-0011)
EXPANDS LEGALIZATION OF CANNABIS AND HEMP. INITIATIVE STATUTE.
Summary Date: 10/23/19 | Circulation Deadline: 04/20/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Patrick Hiram Moore, Jason Tyler West, Jeanette Perez

Repeals existing conflicting laws regulating cultivation, sale, and use of cannabis and hemp. Legalizes cannabis and hemp, as defined. Expands judicial relief, including release from custody, for existing cannabis/hemp convictions. Prohibits permit, license, and tax requirements for personal uses; increases amount allowed for personal use. Prohibits commercial regulation beyond manner applicable to beer/wine; limits retail tax to 10%. Allows doctors to recommend cannabis without prescription; prohibits taxation of medicinal cannabis. Limits cannabis testing for employment or insurance purposes. Bars state or local aid to enforce federal cannabis/hemp laws. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Reduced state and local tax revenues related to the production and sale of cannabis, likely in the mid-to-high hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Reduced state and local license fee revenue – likely in excess of $100 million annually – which could result in some of the regulatory costs being supported from other fund sources (such as the state General Fund). (19-0011.)

1874. (19-0012)
REPLACES STATE SENATE AND ASSEMBLY WITH SINGLE-HOUSE LEGISLATURE; INCREASES NUMBER OF LEGISLATORS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.
Summary Date: 10/23/19 | Circulation Deadline: 04/20/20 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Sharon Durst

Replaces current State Senate and Assembly of 40 Senators and 80 Assemblymembers with a nonpartisan single-house legislature starting in 2022, initially consisting of 250 legislators. Starting in 2024, the single-house legislature would have one legislator for every 80,000 to 100,000 persons in California. The number of legislators would be updated every ten years to reflect population changes as reported by the national Census. Legislators in the single-house legislature would serve four-year terms, and could serve for no more than twelve years. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time costs of hundreds of millions of dollars to expand the State Capitol in Sacramento, with ongoing increased building maintenance costs of a few million dollars annually. Increased state costs of millions of dollars per year to oversee elections. Increased county costs of up to the low tens of millions of dollars annually to administer elections. Increased state costs of millions of dollars for the Citizen Redistricting Commission each decade. (19-0012.)

1875. (19-0013)
REQUIRES RANKED-CHOICE VOTING SYSTEM FOR FEDERAL AND STATE ELECTIONS. RESTRUCTURES STATE SENATE TO MULTI-MEMBER DISTRICTS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.
Summary Date: 10/24/19 | Circulation Deadline: 04/21/20 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Scott Mathog

Allows voters to rank all candidates in order of preference in Congressional, State Officer, and Presidential elections. If voter’s highest-ranked candidate is eliminated, then the vote (or a portion of it, in some instances) is transferred to the next continuing candidate, as specified. Repeats rounds of counting, elimination, and reallocation until winners are determined. Changes composition of state Senate from forty single-member districts to eight five-member districts. Changes petition procedures and requires ranked-choice voting for recall elections. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state elections costs potentially totaling millions of dollars for every two-year election cycle. Increased local elections costs potentially totaling tens of millions of dollars for every two-year election cycle. (19-0013.)

1876. (19-0016)
DECRIMINALIZES PSILOCYBIN MUSHROOMS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.
Summary Date: 11/27/19 | Circulation Deadline: 05/26/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Ryan Munevar

Decriminalizes under state law the personal possession, storage, use, cultivation, manufacturing, giving away or furnishing for personal use, or consumption of psilocybin mushrooms and the hallucinogenic chemical compounds contained in them (including psilocybin and psilocin). Applies to individuals at least 18 years of age, and individuals under 18 years of age with parental or guardian consent. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Reduced costs, not likely to exceed a few million dollars annually, to state and local governments related to enforcing psilocybin-related offenses; handling the related criminal cases in the court system; and incarcerating and supervising certain psilocybin offenders. Potential increase in state and local tax revenues, not likely to exceed a couple million dollars annually, related to the production and sale of psilocybin. (19-0016A1.)

1877. (19-0018A1)
ADJUSTS LIMITATIONS IN MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.
Summary Date: 12/02/19 | Circulation Deadline: 06/01/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Scott Olsen, Nelson A. Moreno, Bree Lynn Moreno

In medical negligence cases, adjusts for inflation: (1) $250,000 limit established in 1975 on quality-of-life and survivor damages (which include pain and suffering); and (2) contingent attorney’s fees limits established in 1987. In cases involving death or permanent injury, allows judge or jury to exceed these limits and requires judge to award attorney’s fees. Requires attorneys filing medical negligence cases to certify reasonable basis for claims or good faith attempt to obtain medical opinion; attorneys who file meritless lawsuits must pay defendant’s expenses. Extends deadlines for filing medical negligence lawsuits. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state and local government health care costs predominantly from raising or removing the cap on noneconomic damages in medical malpractice cases, likely ranging from the low tens of millions of dollars to the high hundreds of millions of dollars annually. (19-0018.)

1878. (19-0020A1)
REQUIRES ENACTMENT OF MEASURES TO REDUCE THE USE OF NON-ORGANIC FUNGICIDES, HERBICIDES, INSECTICIDES, AND FUMIGANTS. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Summary Date: 12/11/19 | Circulation Deadline: 06/08/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Robert Henry Cannard

Requires Governor and Legislature to enact measures to: (1) reduce by 3% annually the use of fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, and fumigants that do not conform with federal organic standards (with reduction applicable to agricultural, forestry, residential, and governmental uses); and (2) levy 0.1% assessment on non-conforming products to fund research into reducing their use. Requires research funds be distributed equally between governmental and non-governmental entities, with no more than 0.1% of total allocated to a single project. Requires annual publication of progress reports. Fiscal Impact: It is the opinion of the Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance that the measure would result in a substantial net change in state and local finances. (19-0020A1.)

1879. (19-0021A1)
AMENDS CONSUMER PRIVACY LAWS. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Summary Date: 12/17/19 | Circulation Deadline: 06/15/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Alastair Mactaggart

Permits consumers to: (1) prevent businesses from sharing personal information; (2) correct inaccurate personal information; and (3) limit businesses’ use of “sensitive personal information”—such as precise geolocation; race; ethnicity; religion; genetic data; union membership; private communications; and certain sexual orientation, health, and biometric information. Changes criteria for which businesses must comply with these laws. Prohibits businesses’ retention of personal information for longer than reasonably necessary. Triples maximum penalties for violations concerning consumers under age 16. Establishes California Privacy Protection Agency to enforce and implement consumer privacy laws, and impose administrative fines. Requires adoption of substantive regulations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased annual state costs of roughly $10 million for a new state agency to monitor compliance and enforcement of consumer privacy laws. Increased state costs, potentially reaching the low millions of dollars annually, from increased workload to DOJ and the state courts, some or all of which would be offset by penalty revenues. Unknown impact on state and local tax revenues due to economic effects resulting from new requirements on businesses to protect consumer information. (19-0021A1.)

1880. (19-0022A1)
AUTHORIZES BONDS TO CONTINUE FUNDING STEM CELL AND OTHER MEDICAL RESEARCH. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Summary Date: 12/17/19 | Circulation Deadline: 06/15/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Robert N. Klein

Authorizes $5.5 billion in state general obligation bonds to fund grants from the California Institute of Regenerative Medicine to educational, non-profit, and private entities for: (1) stem cell and other medical research, therapy development, and therapy delivery; (2) medical training; and (3) construction of research facilities. Dedicates $1.5 billion to fund research and therapy for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, stroke, epilepsy, and other brain and central nervous system diseases and conditions. Limits bond issuance to $540 million annually. Appropriates money from General Fund to repay bond debt, but postpones repayment for first five years. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: State costs of $7.8 billion to pay off principal ($5.5 billion) and interest ($2.3 billion) on the bonds. Associated average annual debt payments of about $310 million for 25 years. The costs could be higher or lower than these estimates depending on factors such as the interest rate and the period of time over which the bonds are repaid. The state General Fund would pay most of the costs, with a relatively small amount of interest repaid by bond proceeds. (19-0022A1.)

1881. (19-0024)
REQUIRES ARREST FOR SPECIFIED OFFENSES AND, IF CONVICTED, DETENTION OR INTERVENTION PROGRAMS. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Summary Date: 12/19/19 | Circulation Deadline: 06/16/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Mike Gatto

Requires arrest and detention for pretrial risk assessment when officer has probable cause that arrestee committed specified offenses, such as disorderly conduct and drug possession. Establishes specialized courts in counties with populations over 100,000 to determine if economic, substance abuse, or mental health issues were contributing factors in offense; if so, requires referrals to social-safety-net assistance or incarceration for drug treatment or mental health care. Amends Mental Health Services Act to utilize existing funding for such courts and programs. Establishes rules for expunging sentences for specified offenses. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased criminal justice system costs, particularly for courts, substance use disorder treatment, and mental health treatment, which could be in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Some or all of these costs would be funded by a shift of about $860 million in existing state revenues. Decreased funding of about $860 million for certain mental health programs. State and local governments could face ongoing cost to replace this funding. (19-0024A1.)

1882. (19-0025A1)
AUTHORIZES STATE REGULATION OF KIDNEY DIALYSIS CLINICS. ESTABLISHES MINIMUM STAFFING AND OTHER REQUIREMENTS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.  

Summary Date: 12/30/19 | Circulation Deadline: 06/29/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Sarah Steck, Elliott Petty

Requires at least one licensed physician on site during treatment at outpatient kidney dialysis clinics; authorizes Department of Public Health to exempt clinics from this requirement due to shortages of qualified licensed physicians if at least one nurse practitioner or physician assistant is on site. Requires clinics to report dialysis-related infection data to state and federal governments. Requires state approval for clinics to close or reduce services. Prohibits clinics from discriminating against patients based on the source of payment for care. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state and local health care costs, likely in the low tens of millions of dollars annually, resulting from increased dialysis treatment costs. (19-0025A1.)

1883. (19-0026A1)
CHANGES EMPLOYMENT CLASSIFICATION RULES FOR APP-BASED TRANSPORTATION AND DELIVERY DRIVERS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.  

Summary Date: 01/02/20 | Circulation Deadline: 06/30/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Sarah Steck, Elliott Petty | Official Top Funders List 

Establishes different criteria for determining whether app-based transportation (rideshare) and delivery drivers are “employees” or “independent contractors.” Independent contractors are not entitled to certain state-law protections afforded employees—including minimum wage, overtime, unemployment insurance, and workers’ compensation. Instead, companies with independentcontractor drivers will be required to provide specified alternative benefits, including: minimum compensation and healthcare subsidies based on engaged driving time, vehicle insurance, safety training, and sexual harassment policies. Restricts local regulation of app-based drivers; criminalizes impersonation of such drivers; requires background checks. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increase in state personal income tax revenue of an unknown amount. (19-0026A1)

1884. (19-0027A1)
DECRIMINALIZES PSILOCYBIN MUSHROOMS. AUTHORIZES DISMISSAL OF PRIOR PSILOCYBIN-RELATED CONVICTIONS. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Summary Date: 01/08/20 | Circulation Deadline: 07/06/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Ryan Munevar

Decriminalizes under state law the cultivation, manufacture, processing, production of edible products and extracts, distribution, transportation, possession, storage, consumption, and retail sale of psilocybin mushrooms and the hallucinogenic chemical compounds contained in them. Applies to individuals at least 18 years of age, and to individuals under 18 years of age as prescribed by a doctor. Authorizes dismissal, resentencing, and destruction of records for prior psilocybin-related arrests and convictions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time state and local court and law enforcement costs in the tens of millions of dollars primarily related to the identification and destruction of arrest and conviction records for psilocybin-related crimes. Reduced costs, not likely to exceed a few million dollars annually, to state and local governments related to enforcing psilocybin-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising psilocybin offenders. Annual state costs to regulate psilocybin businesses, ranging from minimal to the tens of millions of dollars. Some or all of these costs could eventually be partially or fully offset by fee revenue. Potential increase in state and local tax revenues, not likely to exceed a couple million dollars annually. (19-0027A1.)

1885. (19-0028A1)
REQUIRES STATE REGULATIONS TO REDUCE PLASTIC WASTE, TAX PRODUCERS OF SINGLE-USE PLASTICS, AND FUND RECYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 01/08/20 | Circulation Deadline: 07/06/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Michael J. Sangiacomo, Caryl Hart, and Linda Escalante | Official Top Funders List

Requires CalRecycle to adopt regulations reducing plastic waste, including to: (1) require that single-use plastic packaging, containers, and utensils be reusable, recyclable, or compostable, and to reduce such waste by 25%, by 2030; (2) prohibit polystyrene container use by food vendors; and (3) tax producers of single-use plastic packaging, containers, or utensils by January 1, 2022, and allocate revenues for recycling and environmental programs, including local water supply protection. Prohibits Legislature from reducing funding to specified state environmental agencies below 2019 levels. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: State revenue from new tax on single-use plastic packaging and foodware likely in the range of a few billion dollars annually. Revenues would be used to administer and implement programs intended to reduce waste, increase recycling, and restore habitats. Unknown net effect on local governments. There would likely be increased costs for waste collecting and sorting which might be partially or fully offset by new tax revenue, payments from producers to support recycling, or lower costs associated with a reduction in total plastic waste collected. (19-0028A1.)

1886. (19-0029A1)
AUTHORIZES NEW TYPES OF GAMBLING. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AND STATUTORY AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 01/21/20 | Circulation Deadline: 07/20/20 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Edwin "Thorpe" Romero, Jeff L. Grubbe, Anthony Roberts, Mark Macarro | Official Top Funders List

Allows federally recognized Native American tribes to operate roulette, dice games, and sports wagering on tribal lands, subject to compacts negotiated by the Governor and ratified by the Legislature. Beginning in 2022, allows on-site sports wagering at only privately operated horse-racing tracks in four specified counties for persons 21 years or older. Imposes 10% tax on sports-wagering profits at horse-racing tracks; directs portion of revenues to enforcement and problem-gambling programs. Prohibits marketing of sports wagering to persons under 21. Authorizes private lawsuits to enforce other gambling laws. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state revenues, potentially reaching the tens of millions of dollars annually, from payments made by facilities offering sports wagering and new civil penalties authorized by this measure. Some portion of these revenues would reflect a shift from other existing state and local revenues. Increased state regulatory costs, potentially reaching the low tens of millions of dollars annually. Some or all of these costs would be offset by the increased revenue or reimbursements to the state. Increased state enforcement costs, not likely to exceed several million dollars annually, related to a new civil enforcement tool for enforcing certain gaming laws. (19-0029A1.)

 

1887. (19-0030A1)
AUTHORIZES STATE REGULATION OF KIDNEY DIALYSIS CLINICS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 01/21/20 | Circulation Deadline: 07/20/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Thomas W. Hiltachk

Requires kidney dialysis clinics to report dialysis-related infection data to state and federal governments; requires Department of Public Health to conform state reporting, form, and schedule requirements to existing requirements under federal law. Requires written notice to State and patients at least 60 days before a clinic’s permanent closure. Prohibits clinics from discriminating against patients based on the source of payment for care. Replicates existing federal law requiring clinics to have a medical director who is a licensed physician. Fiscal Impact: It is the opinion of the Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance that the measure would have no significant fiscal effect on state and local governments. (19-0030A1.)

 

 

*Elections Cozde section 9034 requires that once proponent(s) of a proposed initiative measure have gathered 25% of the number of signatures required (currently 155,803 for an initiative statute and 249,352 for a constitutional amendment) proponent(s) must immediately certify that they have done so under penalty of perjury to the Secretary of State.

Upon receipt of the certification, the Secretary of State must provide copies of the proposed initiative measure and the circulating title and summary to the Senate and the Assembly. Each house is required to assign the proposed initiative measure to its appropriate committees and hold joint public hearings, at least 131 days before the date of the election at which the measure is to be voted on. However, the Legislature cannot amend the proposed initiative measure or prevent it from appearing on the ballot.