The Attorney General prepares a circulating title and summary of the chief purpose and points of a proposed initiative measure. Proposed initiative measures are cleared for circulation on the day the circulating title and summary is sent to the initiative proponent(s). No petition may be circulated for signatures before it has been cleared to do so by the Attorney General.

Please note: Counties have 8 working days after a proposed initiative measure's circulation deadline (Elections Code section 9030(b)) to notify the Secretary of State's Office if any petition signatures were received. If no signatures are submitted, a proposed initiative measure will fail on the 9th working day after its circulation deadline.

1909. (21-0015A1)
ELIMINATES PROPERTY TAX REASSESSMENT FOR CERTAIN FAMILY REAL PROPERTY TRANSFERS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/04/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/03/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139 - (25% of Signatures Reached 04/25/2022 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Jon Coupal

Exempts from property tax reassessment transfers of primary residences between parents and children (and grandparents to grandchildren if parents are deceased), regardless of value (removing cap set in 2020 by Proposition 19). Also exempts transfers between same family members of other real property valued up to $2.4 million (e.g., second homes, rental/business properties). Reduces local property tax revenues and eliminates California Fire Response Fund created by Proposition 19. Requires state to reimburse local agencies for property tax losses due to Proposition 19’s other tax changes. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state costs of hundreds of millions of dollars per year to cover recent local government property tax losses. These costs would grow over time, possibly to $1 billion or more per year. Local government funding would decline by tens of millions of dollars per year. Over time, these losses would grow to hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Schools would have losses of similar amounts. (21-0015A1)

1912. (21-0018)
LIMITS STATE AND LOCAL OFFICIALS’ AUTHORITY TO RESPOND TO PUBLIC-HEALTH AND OTHER EMERGENCIES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/04/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/03/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): John B. Estill, Richard C. Altmaier

Restricts state and local officials’ authority to issue orders restricting business or school operations during public-health and certain other emergencies, including storm, drought, energy shortage, or cyberterrorism. Limits orders’ duration to 30 days, unless extended by Legislature or local governing body. Prohibits orders from distinguishing between businesses based on size. Requires orders to permit schools to remain open to maximum extent possible. Requires online publication of information justifying orders; prohibits officials from relying on other information to defend orders against legal challenge. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown fiscal effect on the state and local governments due to requirements that could change the use of shutdown orders during emergencies. (21-0018.)

1913. (21-0019)
ALLOWS A PARTY TO CHOOSE TO HAVE A JURY TRIAL IN CHILD-CUSTODY AND DEPENDENT-CHILD CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/12/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/11/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Wylmina Hettinga, Stephen Konnoff

Allows a party in child custody cases to choose that a jury, rather than a judge, determines who receives legal custody of the child. Prohibits the judge from rejecting a jury’s decision in child-custody cases. Allows a party in dependent-child proceedings to choose that a jury, rather than a judge, determines whether a child should be declared a dependent of the court. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown ongoing net fiscal impact on state courts that would depend significantly on (1) how the measure is interpreted and implemented by the courts and (2) how individuals respond to the ability to demand a jury trial in child custody and juvenile dependency jurisdictional hearings. Potential ongoing increase in county costs that could reach the low millions of dollars annually related to juvenile dependency jurisdictional cases – some or all of which could be shifted to the state. (21-0019.)

1914. (21-0020)
ABOLISHES THE CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION AND TRANSFERS ITS DUTIES TO OTHER STATE AGENCIES. APPROPRIATES FUNDS FOR WILDFIRE VICTIMS FROM UNSPECIFIED STATE SOURCE. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/18/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/17/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Adolfo Ramos

Amends the California Constitution to abolish the California Public Utilities Commission (which regulates privately owned electric, natural gas, telecommunications, water, railroad, rail transit, and passenger transportation companies) and requires the Legislature to reallocate the Commission’s functions, duties, and regulatory authority to other state agencies, departments, or boards. Creates a $90 million “Special Wildfire Victims’ Fund” (replenished annually and adjusted for inflation), appropriated from unspecified state funds and administered by the State Fire Chief, to assist wildfire victims with their housing, food, and other basic needs. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: About $90 million in one-time state costs to establish the Special Wildfire Victims Fund, plus annual state costs of up to tens of millions of dollars, depending on the severity of wildfire damage each year. One-time state costs in the low tens of millions of dollars to relocate California Public Utilities Commission staff to other state agencies. Ongoing net state savings of several million dollars annually or one-time state revenues of $100 million to $200 million, depending on use of the existing commission headquarters in San Francisco. (21-0020.)

1915. (21-0021)
MANDATES GOVERNMENT-ISSUED IDENTIFICATION TO VOTE AND SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER TO REGISTER. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/19/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/18/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Carl DeMaio

Changes existing voter laws by requiring: (1) in-person voters to present a government-issued identification card; (2) mail-in voters to provide a government-issued identification card number and signature matching their voter file; and (3) all voters to provide a full Social Security number when they register to vote and to verify existing registrations. Amends Constitution to require, consistent with existing state and federal laws, that counties maintain accurate voter registration lists. Requires counties to report in-person voting wait times after each election. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time state and local government costs in the millions of dollars to update voter registrations. Increased annual state and local government costs, potentially in the tens of millions of dollars, to administer elections. (21-0021.)

1916. (21-0022A1)
PROVIDES FUNDING FOR PANDEMIC DETECTION AND PREVENTION BY INCREASING TAX ON PERSONAL INCOME OVER $5 MILLION. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/22/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/23/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/15/2022 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Max Henderson, Anna Maybach

Increases tax on personal income over $5 million by 0.75% for 10 years, and allocates new tax revenues as follows: 50% to the California Institute for Pandemic Prevention (established by this measure), to award grants for research and development of technologies to detect and prevent future pandemics; 25% for public health programs for pandemic preparedness; and 25% for improvements to school facilities to limit disease transmission. Creates Independent Scientific Governing Board to administer the Institute; requires board members have specified medical, technological, or public-health expertise. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state tax revenues that likely would range from around $500 million to $1.5 billion annually for the ten-year period the new tax would be in effect. Revenues entirely would support activities related to infectious disease control and pandemic prevention. (21-0022A1.)

1917. (21-0023)
INCREASES HOMEOWNERS’ REAL PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION AND PROVIDES SUPPLEMENTAL RENTERS’ TAX CREDIT. INCREASES TAXES ON HIGH-VALUE PROPERTIES. LIMITS LOCAL RESTRICTIONS ON HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/30/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/31/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Stanley R. Apps

Increases the portion of a homeowner’s property value that is exempt from property tax, from $7,000 currently to $200,000 (adjusted for inflation). Provides up to $2,000 supplemental income tax credit for renters (adjusted for inflation). Reimburses local governments’ lost revenue from these tax changes by enacting new property tax surcharge of up to 1.4% on properties valued over $4 million. Limits local government discretion to deny certain proposed housing development projects. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased property taxes on property with a taxable value of more than $4 million providing $16 billion to $20 billion in new revenue. Increased state costs resulting from the increases to the homeowners’ property tax exemption and renters’ tax credit. Increased costs to local governments for carrying out the measure. Total costs would be about $15 billion annually and likely would be fully offset by revenue from increased property taxes on higher value properties. (21-0023.)

1918. (21-0024A1)
TRANSFERS CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY FOR WRITING STATEWIDE BALLOT-MEASURE SUMMARIES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/02/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/31/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Sam Blakeslee

Transfers the elected Attorney General’s constitutional and statutory authority to write summaries of statewide ballot measures for use in election materials and for collecting qualifying signatures to the Legislative Analyst, who is appointed by a joint committee of the Legislature. Eliminates existing requirement that summaries describe a measure’s chief purpose and points; instead, requires summaries describe the primary changes in law. Requires advisory committee to recommend changes to summaries for clarity. Requires Legislative Analyst to post on website documents it receives relating to ballot measures. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Depending on how the measure were implemented, there could be minor state savings or costs. (21-0024A1.)

1919. (21-0025A2)
LIMITS GOVERNMENT AUTHORITY TO PROTECT PUBLIC HEALTH AND PROHIBITS CERTAIN GOVERNMENT PUBLIC HEALTH MEASURES INCLUDING VACCINATION REQUIREMENTS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/03/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/01/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Dean Lopato

Prohibits range of government public health measures, including vaccination requirements and fluoridation of drinking water. Repeals laws permitting governmental intervention if parents fail to provide necessary medical care to children. Creates new constitutional right called “medical freedom” and other new constitutional rights related to public health interventions and medical treatments. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Highly uncertain fiscal effects on state and local governments, ranging from relatively minor to very significant potential costs. The magnitude of the potential costs depends heavily on the way provisions of the measure would be interpreted by the courts, how certain provisions would be implemented, and how various economic sectors and individuals might respond in the long term. (21-0025A2)

1920. (21-0026A1)
LIMITS STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS’ ABILITY TO RAISE REVENUES FOR GOVERNMENT SERVICES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 12/07/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Thomas W. Hiltachk

For new state taxes, requires voter approval (added to current requirement that Legislature approve by two-thirds vote any taxes it proposes). For new local taxes, local governing body must approve by two-thirds any taxes it proposes, and voters’ approval must occur in a general election. Expands definition of “taxes” to include certain regulatory fees, broadening application of approval requirements. Requires Legislature or local governing body to approve all other fees by two-thirds vote. Requires that tax measures specifically limit how revenues may be spent. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Potentially substantially lower annual state and local revenues, depending on future actions of the Legislature, local governing bodies, voters, and the courts. (21-0026A1)

1921. (21-0027A1)
ELIMINATES EMPLOYEES’ ABILITY TO FILE LAWSUITS FOR MONETARY PENALTIES FOR STATE LABOR-LAW VIOLATIONS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/08/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/03/2022 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Brian Maas

Repeals 2004 law allowing employees to file lawsuits on behalf of themselves and other employees against employers to recover monetary penalties for certain state labor-law violations. Labor Commissioner retains authority to enforce labor laws and impose penalties. Eliminates Labor Commissioner’s authority to contract with private organizations or attorneys to assist with enforcement. Requires Legislature to provide funding of unspecified amount for Labor Commissioner enforcement. Requires Labor Commissioner to provide pre-enforcement advice; allows employers to correct identified labor-law violations without penalties. Authorizes increased penalties for willful violations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Likely increase in state costs to enforce labor laws that could exceed $100 million per year. Reduction in state penalty revenue used for labor law enforcement in the tens of millions of dollars annually. (21-0027A1.)

1922. (21-0028)
PROHIBITS FRACKING AND PHASES OUT USE OF OIL, NATURAL GAS, AND COAL. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/08/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Kamyar Feiz

As of May 1, 2023, prohibits hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) and other processes used to increase oil and gas well production. Prohibits oil and gas extraction within “health protection zones,” including near hospitals, residential areas, or schools. Prohibits authorization of new oil and gas well operators; and, starting in 2025, prohibits new wells. Limits amounts that may be extracted from existing wells, with allowed amounts phasing out to zero by 2045. Starting in 2025, prohibits government agencies from using coal. Prohibits any use of fossil fuels starting in 2050. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Likely decrease in state tax and fee revenues over time that could reach several hundred million dollars annually, primarily from reduced state income tax and sales tax paid by oil and gas extraction businesses, their employees, and others with jobs induced by the oil and gas industry. Decreased local tax and fee revenues over time that could reach several hundred million dollars annually, including lower property assessment revenues from parcels with oil and gas deposits, as well as lower royalties from oil and gas production. Increased one-time state costs and cost pressures potentially totaling more than ten billion dollars over the next few decades to plug abandoned wells and compensate oil and gas companies for the reduction in value. Unknown fiscal effects from the prohibition on the consumption of fossil fuels that could range from relatively minor to substantial reductions in state and local revenues depending on several factors, including economic, policy, and technological changes. (21-0028.)

1923. (21-0029A1)
REQUIRES PRE-LAWSUIT NOTICE AND LIMITS PLAINTIFFS’ ATTORNEYS’ CONTINGENCY FEES IN CONSUMER PROTECTION AND TORT CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Kyla Christoffersen Powell

Requires plaintiffs to provide 60 days’ notice and opportunity to settle before filing lawsuits for tort claims (for example, personal injury, product liability, negligence) or certain consumer-protection violations (for example, unfair competition, false advertising, warranty). Limits contingency fees that attorneys can charge prevailing plaintiffs in these cases to 20% of amount recovered. For specified consumer-protection claims, limits court-ordered attorneys’ fee awards to 20% of amount recovered. Does not restrict fee arrangements for defendants’ attorneys. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown net impact on state courts that would depend primarily on how attorneys, plaintiffs, and defendants respond to this measure, as well as how the measure is interpreted and implemented by the courts. (21-0029A1.)

1924. (21-0030A1)
LIMITS PLAINTIFFS’ ATTORNEYS’ CONTINGENCY FEES IN CONSUMER PROTECTION AND TORT CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Kyla Christoffersen Powell

Limits the amount of contingency fees attorneys can charge prevailing plaintiffs for tort claims (for example, personal injury, product liability, negligence) and certain consumer-protection violations (for example, unfair competition, false advertising, warranty). Limits such contingency fee to 20% of the amount recovered by the plaintiff. For specified consumer-protection claims, limits court-ordered attorneys’ fee awards to 20% of amount recovered in the lawsuit. Does not restrict fee arrangements for defendants’ attorneys. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown net impact on state courts that would depend primarily on how attorneys, plaintiffs, and defendants respond to this measure. (21-0030A1.)

1925. (21-0031)
LIMITS PLAINTIFFS’ ATTORNEYS’ CONTINGENCY FEES IN TORT CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Kyla Christoffersen Powell

Limits the amount of contingency fees attorneys can charge prevailing plaintiffs for tort claims (for example, personal injury, product liability, negligence). Limits such contingency fee to 20% of the amount recovered by the plaintiff. Does not restrict fee arrangements for defendants’ attorneys. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown net impact on state courts that would depend primarily on how attorneys, plaintiffs, and defendants respond to this measure. (21-0031.)

1926. (21-0032A1)
INCREASES HOMEOWNERS’ PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION AND RENTERS’ TAX CREDIT. INCREASES TAXES ON HIGH-VALUE PROPERTIES. LIMITS LOCAL RESTRICTIONS ON HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Stanley R. Apps

Increases portion of homeowner’s property value that is exempt from property tax from $7,000 to $200,000 (adjusted for inflation). Increases renters’ income tax credit to up to $2,000 (adjusted for inflation); increases income limit for claiming credit to up to $400,000. Reimburses local governments’ lost revenue from these changes with new property tax surcharge of up to 1.2% on properties valued over $4 million. Limits local government discretion to deny certain housing development projects. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased property taxes on property with a taxable value of more than $4 million providing $16 billion to $19 billion in new revenue. Increased state costs resulting from the increases to the homeowners’ property tax exemption and renters’ tax credit. Increased costs to local governments for carrying out the measure. Total costs would be $16 billion to $19 billion annually and likely would be fully offset by revenue from increased property taxes on higher value properties. (21-0032A1.)

1927. (21-0033A1)
AUTHORIZES ADDITIONAL LAWSUITS CHALLENGING PUBLIC EDUCATION POLICIES AND ACTIONS BY CREATING NEW CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Proponent(s): Emelyn Rodriquez

Creates new constitutional right for all public school students in preschool through high school, including charter schools, to a “high-quality” education, the requirements of which will be defined by the courts. Allows lawsuits only by parents and certain nonprofit organizations representing students to enjoin or invalidate any law, regulation, policy, or action that allegedly violates this new right. Policies that do not “put the interests of students first,” which is not defined, are deemed to violate the new right. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown litigation and court-related costs for the state and schools that would depend significantly on the number of lawsuits filed on behalf of public school students. (21-0033A1.)

1928. (21-0034A1)
AUTHORIZES BONDS TO FUND CLEANUP OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND WATER. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Andre Quintero

Authorizes $2.7 billion in state general obligation bonds as follows: $1.7 billion to the Department of Toxic Substances Control ($1 billion to clean up contaminated sites, with priority to certain properties in Brisbane, Carson, El Monte, Lynwood, Newport Beach, Richmond, and Sacramento; $500 million to implement existing hazardous waste laws; $200 million to clean up schools); $600 million for grants to local governments and nonprofit organizations to acquire and remediate contaminated properties, including conversion to parks; $300 million for groundwater cleanup; $100 million for hazardous materials response. Appropriates money from General Fund to repay bonds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state costs of $4.3 billion to pay off principal ($2.7 billion) and interest ($1.6 billion) on bonds over the next 30 years. Annual payments would average about $140 million. (21-0034A1.)

1929. (21-0035A1)
REPEALS THREE STRIKES SENTENCING LAW. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/29/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): John Yahya Johnson, Earlonne Woods

Eliminates third-strike sentencing enhancement that currently imposes life imprisonment with possibility of parole for serious felony offenders with two or more prior serious or violent felony convictions. Eliminates second-strike sentencing enhancement that currently doubles sentence term for felony offenders with one prior serious or violent felony conviction. Requires resentencing of inmates who would have received lesser sentences under this measure. Maintains other sentencing enhancements for repeat offenders. Applies savings from sentencing changes to public school youth-mentoring programs, tuition assistance at California Community Colleges and California State University, and restorative justice and transitional housing programs. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Net state criminal justice system savings that could range from the low hundreds of millions of dollars to over $1 billion annually, which would be spent on education, restorative justice, and transitional housing. Temporary increase in county criminal justice system costs that could be in the tens of millions of dollars annually. (21-0035A1.)

1931. (21-0037A1)
PROVIDES FUNDING FOR PROGRAMS TO REDUCE GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS BY INCREASING TAX ON PERSONAL INCOME OVER $2 MILLION. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 01/10/22 | Circulation Deadline: 07/11/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/16/2022 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Joseph F. Wiedman

Increases tax on personal income over $2 million by 1.75% for individuals and married couples and allocates new tax revenues as follows: (1) 45% for rebates and other incentives for zero-emission vehicle purchases and 35% for charging stations for zero-emission vehicles, with at least half of this funding directed to low-income households and communities; and (2) 20% for wildfire prevention and suppression programs, with priority given to hiring and training firefighters. Requires audits of programs and expenditures. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased annual state tax revenue ranging from $3 billion to $4.5 billion, with the additional revenue used to support zero-emission vehicle programs and wildfire-related activities. Potential increased state administrative costs paid from other funding sources that could reach tens of millions to the low hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Net decrease in state and local transportation revenue of up to several tens of millions of dollars annually in the initial years, and growing to up to a few hundreds of millions of dollars annually after several years. (21-0037A1.)

1933. (21-0039A1)
ALLOWS IN-PERSON AND ONLINE SPORTS WAGERING AND OTHER NEW TYPES OF GAMBLING. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 01/11/22 | Circulation Deadline: 07/11/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139 - (25% of Signatures Reached 3/10/2022 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Bo Mazzetti, Jesus Tarango, Ken Ramirez

Legalizes in-person sports wagering, roulette, and dice games on tribal lands, and online sports wagering statewide, if operated by federally recognized Indian tribes under (1) compacts approved by Legislature, (2) the model compact approved by this measure, or (3) laws enacted by this measure and state regulations approved by tribal representatives. Sports wagering limited to persons 21 and older. Directs 15% of sports-wagering profits to nonparticipating tribes and 10% first to regulatory costs and then to homelessness/mental-health programs. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state revenues that could range from the tens of millions of dollars to the mid-hundreds of millions of dollars annually, depending on how the measure is implemented and legally interpreted. Some portion of these revenues would reflect a shift from other existing state and local revenues. Increased state regulatory costs, potentially in the low- to mid-tens of millions of dollars annually. Some or all of these costs would be offset by the increased revenue or reimbursements to the state. (21-0039A1.)

1934. (21-0041A1)
AUTHORIZES FELONY SENTENCES FOR CERTAIN THEFTS UNDER $950. REQUIRES LONGER SENTENCES FOR SPECIFIED PROPERTY LOSSES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 01/27/22 | Circulation Deadline: 07/26/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Thomas W. Hiltachk

Authorizes prosecutors to file felony or misdemeanor charges for thefts of any amount under $950—currently chargeable as felonies only in certain circumstances—against any person with two or more prior specified theft convictions. Adds mandatory sentencing enhancement for any felony resulting in significant property loss or damage, ranging from one additional year for losses over $50,000, to four years for losses over $3,000,000, plus one year for each additional $3,000,000. Authorizes prosecution for theft in any county where acts in furtherance occurred. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state criminal justice system costs potentially in the low tens of millions of dollars annually, primarily due to an increase in the state prison population. Some of these costs could be offset by reductions in certain spending on mental health and substance use services, truancy and dropout prevention, and victim services due to requirements in current law. Increased county criminal justice system costs potentially in the low tens of millions of dollars annually, primarily due to increases in county jail and community supervision populations. (21-0041A1.)

1935. (21-0042A1)
LIMITS ABILITY OF VOTERS AND STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS TO RAISE REVENUES FOR GOVERNMENT SERVICES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 02/03/22 | Circulation Deadline: 08/02/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139 - (25% of Signatures Reached 03/16/2022 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Thomas W. Hiltachk

For new or increased state taxes currently enacted by two-thirds vote of Legislature, also requires statewide election and majority voter approval. Limits voters’ ability to pass voter-proposed local special taxes by raising vote requirement to two-thirds. Eliminates voters’ ability to advise how to spend revenues from proposed general tax on same ballot as the proposed tax. Expands definition of “taxes” to include certain regulatory fees, broadening application of tax approval requirements. Requires Legislature or local governing body set certain other fees. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Lower annual state and local revenues, potentially substantially lower, depending on future actions of the Legislature, local governing bodies, voters, and the courts. (21-0042A1)

1936. (21-0043A1)
RAISES MINIMUM WAGE. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 02/08/22 | Circulation Deadline: 08/08/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212 - (25% of Signatures Reached 01/21/2022 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Joe Sanberg

Existing law requires annual increases to California’s minimum wage until it has reached $15.00 per hour for all businesses on January 1, 2023. This measure extends these annual increases ($1.00 per year) until minimum wage—currently, $15.00 per hour for businesses with 26 or more employees, and $14.00 per hour for smaller businesses—reaches $18.00 per hour. Thereafter, as existing law requires, the minimum wage will annually adjust for inflation. In periods of decreased economic activity, or General Fund deficit, the Governor may suspend annual increase up to two times, thereby extending timeline for reaching $18.00 per hour. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unclear change in annual state and local tax revenues, likely between a loss of a couple billion dollars and a gain of a few hundred million dollars. Increase in annual state and local government costs likely between half a billion dollars and a few billion dollars. (21-0043A1.)

1937. (21-0044)
RECLASSIFIES FERRETS AS “DOMESTIC ANIMALS.” INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 02/24/22 | Circulation Deadline: 08/23/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Pat Wright

Under current law, California classifies ferrets as “wild animals,” making it illegal to own them as pets without obtaining a permit from the State. This measure would reclassify ferrets as “domestic animals.” If this measure were adopted, additional changes to existing state and local laws and regulations would also be required to legalize ownership of ferrets as pets in California. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Likely would not have immediate or significant fiscal effects on the state or local governments. (21-0044.)

 


*Elections Code section 9034 requires that once proponent(s) of a proposed initiative measure have gathered 25% of the number of signatures required (currently 155,803 for an initiative statute and 249,352 for a constitutional amendment) proponent(s) must immediately certify that they have done so under penalty of perjury to the Secretary of State.

Upon receipt of the certification, the Secretary of State must provide copies of the proposed initiative measure and the circulating title and summary to the Senate and the Assembly. Each house is required to assign the proposed initiative measure to its appropriate committees and hold joint public hearings, at least 131 days before the date of the election at which the measure is to be voted on. However, the Legislature cannot amend the proposed initiative measure or prevent it from appearing on the ballot.