This page contains a list of proposed initiative and referendum measures that during the last 60 days have been withdrawn by proponents or have failed to gather the required number of signatures during the circulation period. 

1877. (19-0018A1)
ADJUSTS LIMITATIONS IN MEDICAL NEGLIGENCE CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Summary Date: 12/02/19 | Circulation Deadline: 06/01/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Withdrawn: 05/19/2022

Proponent(s): Scott Olsen, Nelson A. Moreno, Bree Lynn Moreno

In medical negligence cases, adjusts for inflation: (1) $250,000 limit established in 1975 on quality-of-life and survivor damages (which include pain and suffering); and (2) contingent attorney’s fees limits established in 1987. In cases involving death or permanent injury, allows judge or jury to exceed these limits and requires judge to award attorney’s fees. Requires attorneys filing medical negligence cases to certify reasonable basis for claims or good-faith attempt to obtain medical opinion; attorneys who file meritless lawsuits must pay defendant’s expenses. Extends deadlines for filing medical negligence lawsuits. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state and local government health care costs predominantly from raising or removing the cap on noneconomic damages in medical malpractice cases, likely ranging from the low tens of millions of dollars to the high hundreds of millions of dollars annually. (19-0018.)

1885. (19-0028A1)
REQUIRES STATE REGULATIONS TO REDUCE PLASTIC WASTE, TAX PRODUCERS OF SINGLE-USE PLASTICS, AND FUND RECYCLING AND ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS. INITIATIVE STATUTE. 

Summary Date: 01/08/20 | Circulation Deadline: 07/06/20 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Withdrawn: 06/30/2022
Proponent(s): Michael J. Sangiacomo, Caryl Hart, and Linda Escalante 

Requires CalRecycle to adopt regulations reducing plastic waste, including to: (1) require that single-use plastic packaging, containers, and utensils be reusable, recyclable, or compostable, and to reduce such waste by 25%, by 2030; (2) prohibit polystyrene container use by food vendors; and (3) tax producers of single-use plastic packaging, containers, or utensils by January 1, 2022, and allocate revenues for recycling and environmental programs, including local water supply protection. Prohibits Legislature from reducing funding to specified state environmental agencies below 2019 levels. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: State revenue from new tax on single-use plastic packaging and foodware likely in the range of a few billion dollars annually. Revenues would be used to administer and implement programs intended to reduce waste, increase recycling, and restore habitats. Unknown net effect on local governments. There would likely be increased costs for waste collecting and sorting which might be partially or fully offset by new tax revenue, payments from producers to support recycling, or lower costs associated with a reduction in total plastic waste collected. (19-0028A1.)

1900. (21-0006A1)
REQUIRES STATE FUNDING OF RELIGIOUS AND OTHER PRIVATE SCHOOL EDUCATION. INITIATIVE CONSITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 10/12/21 | Circulation Deadline: 04/11/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 04/22/2022

Proponent(s): Michael Alexander, Marc Ang, Dale R. Broome, Brian Hawkins, Stephen Smith

Requires state to provide yearly voucher payments ($14,000 initially, adjusted annually) into Education Savings Accounts for K-12 students attending religious and other private schools. Funds payments through General Fund and local property tax revenues currently allocated to public (including charter) schools. Eliminates constitutional prohibition on public funding of religious and other private schools. Prevents state from requiring these schools to meet certain requirements (concerning teacher credentialing, curriculum, or disciplinary policies) as condition of funding. Any excess funds in Education Savings Accounts could be used at eligible higher education/vocational schools. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased annual state costs, probably in the range of $4.7 billion to $7 billion, to provide state funding for students currently enrolled in private school or homeschool. Depending on how the state implements the measure, these costs could be paid with reductions to funding for public schools and/or reductions to other programs in the state budget. Increased annual state costs, probably at least several billion dollars, to the extent students move from public to private schools. Lower spending on public schools roughly would offset these costs. Likely reduced state costs for school bonds, potentially reaching a couple hundred million dollars annually within the next few decades. (21-0006A1.)

1901. (21-0007)
AUTHORIZES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE GATHERING FOR INITIATIVE, REFERENDUM, AND RECALL PETITIONS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 10/12/21 | Circulation Deadline: 04/11/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 04/22/2022

Proponent(s): Michael Freeman Liddell

Requires Secretary of State to develop a system that allows voters to view state and local initiative, referendum, and recall petitions on Secretary of State’s website and to sign them electronically directly on the website, or to download, print, and sign the printed petitions. Requires Secretary of State or local elections official to verify these signatures. Requires Secretary of State to invite arguments for and against petitions, and to post submitted arguments on website. Requires Secretary of State’s website to include ongoing tally of each measure’s signatures received electronically or on downloaded petitions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time state and local government costs in the tens of millions of dollars or more to develop an online system for electronic petition signature gathering. Ongoing annual costs of millions of dollars or more to maintain the new system. Potential net costs or savings due to changed state and local government processes for verifying petition signatures. (21-0007.)

1902. (21-0008A2)
ELIMINATES COLLECTIVE BARGAINING FOR TEACHERS, POLICE OFFICERS, NURSES, FIREFIGHTERS, AND OTHER PUBLIC EMPLOYEES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 10/13/21 | Circulation Deadline: 04/11/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed:04/22/2022

Proponent(s): Timothy Draper

Eliminates collective bargaining between state/local governments and labor organizations (including unions) representing teachers, police officers, nurses, firefighters, and other public employees about wages, benefits, hours, labor disputes, or other work conditions. Requires the Governor-appointed State Personnel Board to establish wages and benefits for state employees. Prohibits new or amended public-employee labor agreements, including extensions, but does not impact existing agreements. Authorizes state/local governments to provide up to 12 months of severance pay to employees who resign within three months of measure’s enactment. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time costs, potentially in the range of hundreds of millions to low billions of dollars, across state and local governments. Long-term fiscal effect depends on future actions by state and local policy makers. (21-0008A2.)

1903. (21-0009A1)
ALLOWS NEW TYPES OF GAMBLING, INCLUDING SPORTS WAGERING. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 10/18/21 | Circulation Deadline: 04/18/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed:04/29/2022

Proponent(s): Helen Fisicaro, Raul Peralez, Tasha Cerda

Allows licensed gambling establishments, such as card rooms, to conduct additional games that are played with cards or tiles. Legalizes in-person, online, and mobile sports wagering, which currently is prohibited, for persons 21 years or older. Imposes 15% tax and other fees on sports-wagering revenues; directs revenues first to enforcement and problem-gambling programs, and any remaining funds to public education, homelessness, affordable housing, and mental health programs. Prohibits marketing of sports wagering to persons under 21. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state revenues, potentially reaching the mid-hundreds of millions of dollars annually, from sports wagering taxes and payments (such as licensing fees). Some portion of these revenues would reflect a shift from other existing state and local revenues. Increased state regulatory costs, potentially reaching the high tens of millions of dollars annually, that would be fully or partially offset by the increased revenue or payments required by gaming agreements between tribes and the state. (21-0009A1.)

1904. (21-0010A1)
AMENDS LAWS REGARDING POLICE OFFICER USE OF FORCE, TRAINING, BODY CAMERA, AND BUDGET REQUIREMENTS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 10/27/21 | Circulation Deadline: 04/25/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed:05/06/2022

Proponent(s): Jai Hudson

Seeks to limit when police officers may be shielded from liability for excessive force under the federal “qualified immunity” defense. Requires officers found guilty of excessive force be fired and barred from future service. Requires officers report, and intervene to stop, use of excessive force by other officers. Requires use of body cameras during all on-duty interactions with public, and online posting of all incident recordings. Requires 20 percent of police departments’ budgets and on-duty officer time be used for training. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state and local government costs, which could reach the billions of dollars annually, primarily related to the use of body cameras and increased use of force training. (21-0010A1.)

1905. (21-0011A1)
REQUIRES STATE FUNDING OF RELIGIOUS AND OTHER PRIVATE SCHOOL EDUCATION. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 10/28/21 | Circulation Deadline: 04/26/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed:05/09/2022

Proponent(s): Richard Grenell, Cecilia Iglesias, Maryam Qudrat, Nanxun “Saga” Conroy

Requires state to provide yearly voucher payments ($13,000 initially, adjusted annually) into Education Savings Accounts for K-12 students attending religious and other private schools. Expands eligibility in phases; lower income families eligible first. Funds payments through General Fund and local property tax revenues currently allocated to public (including charter) schools. Eliminates constitutional prohibition on public funding of religious and other private schools. Prevents state from conditioning funding on these schools meeting certain requirements. Up to $60,000 excess funds in Education Savings Accounts could be used at higher education/vocational schools. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased annual state costs, likely growing to $4 billion to $6 billion by the end of the five-year implementation period, to provide state funding for students currently enrolled in private school. Depending on how the state implements the measure, these costs could be paid for with reductions to funding for public schools and/or reductions to other programs in the state budget. Increased annual state costs, probably at least several billion dollars, for students who move from public to private schools. Lower spending on public schools would more than offset these costs, likely producing state savings of several hundred million dollars annually. Likely reduced state costs for school bonds, potentially reaching a couple hundred million dollars annually within the next few decades. (21-0011A1.)

1906. (21-0012)
AUTHORIZES ONLINE VOTING. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 10/28/21 | Circulation Deadline: 04/26/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed:05/09/2022

Proponent(s): Michael Freeman Liddell

Requires Secretary of State to develop online voting system that provides registered voters the option to cast an online ballot (1) from an official online voting machine located at a polling place in the next statewide election, and (2) for subsequent elections, from any location and device (including personal devices). Requires Secretary of State to establish procedures to protect the secrecy of online ballots, including procedures to confirm the identity of the voter. Criminalizes efforts to interfere with online voting system and specifies penalties. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time costs to government, in the range of hundreds of millions of dollars or more, likely to be paid at least in part by the state to establish a new statewide online voting system. Ongoing costs to government, in the range of tens of millions of dollars or more, likely to be paid at least in part by the state each year to maintain the new online voting system and implement other provisions of the measure. (21-0012.)

1908. (21-0014A1)
DIRECTS TWO PERCENT OF GENERAL FUND TO WATER SUPPLY PROJECTS; LIMITS ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR ELIGIBLE PROJECTS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/01/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/02/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 05/13/2022

Proponent(s): Edward Arthur Ring, Shawn Dewane, Wayne Western Jr., Stephen Rex Sheldon, Geoffrey Todd Vanden Heuvel

Transfers two percent of annual General Fund revenues to Water Supply Infrastructure Trust Account for water infrastructure projects until state increases its annual water supply by 5,000,000 acre-feet. Prioritizes funding projects that are approved or ready to start. Authorizes issuance of general obligation bonds for water projects to be repaid with revenues in Trust Account. Limits environmental review of eligible projects through expedited California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process. Limits Coastal Commission review of specified projects; authorizes California Natural Resources Agency to override Coastal Commission decisions. Limits constitutional challenges to approved projects. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Total costs of several tens of billions of dollars for water projects, potentially totaling more than $100 billion, to develop 5 million acre-feet of additional annual water supply. Dedicate between $2.5 billion and $4 billion per year of existing state General Fund revenues for the next few decades to support the above costs. These funds would therefore not be available to support other public services funded by the state. Unknown fiscal impacts on local governments, but likely some net savings from state funds replacing monies that local governments otherwise would have spent on water supply projects.  (21-0014A1.)

1909. (21-0015A1)
ELIMINATES PROPERTY TAX REASSESSMENT FOR CERTAIN FAMILY REAL PROPERTY TRANSFERS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/04/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/03/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139 - (25% of Signatures Reached 04/25/2022 (PDF))
Failed: 05/19/2022

Proponent(s): Jon Coupal

Exempts from property tax reassessment transfers of primary residences between parents and children (and grandparents to grandchildren if parents are deceased), regardless of value (removing cap set in 2020 by Proposition 19). Also exempts transfers between same family members of other real property valued up to $2.4 million (e.g., second homes, rental/business properties). Reduces local property tax revenues and eliminates California Fire Response Fund created by Proposition 19. Requires state to reimburse local agencies for property tax losses due to Proposition 19’s other tax changes. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state costs of hundreds of millions of dollars per year to cover recent local government property tax losses. These costs would grow over time, possibly to $1 billion or more per year. Local government funding would decline by tens of millions of dollars per year. Over time, these losses would grow to hundreds of millions of dollars per year. Schools would have losses of similar amounts. (21-0015A1)

1910. (21-0016A1)
PROVIDES THAT LOCAL LAND-USE AND ZONING LAWS OVERRIDE CONFLICTING STATE LAWS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/01/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/02/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Withdrawn: 04/27/2022

Proponent(s): Bill Brand, John Heath, Peggy Huang, Jovita Mendoza, Dennis Richards

Provides that city and county land-use and zoning laws (including local housing laws) override all conflicting state laws, except in certain circumstances related to three areas of statewide concern: (1) the California Coastal Act of 1976; (2) siting of power plants; or (3) development of water, communication, or transportation infrastructure projects. Prevents state legislature and local legislative bodies from passing laws invalidating voter-approved local land-use or zoning initiatives. Prohibits state from changing, granting, or denying funding to local governments based on their implementation of this measure. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Fiscal effects of the measure depend on future decisions by the cities and counties and therefore are unknown. (21-0016A1.)

1912. (21-0018)
LIMITS STATE AND LOCAL OFFICIALS’ AUTHORITY TO RESPOND TO PUBLIC-HEALTH AND OTHER EMERGENCIES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/04/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/03/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 05/19/2022

Proponent(s): John B. Estill, Richard C. Altmaier

Restricts state and local officials’ authority to issue orders restricting business or school operations during public-health and certain other emergencies, including storm, drought, energy shortage, or cyberterrorism. Limits orders’ duration to 30 days, unless extended by Legislature or local governing body. Prohibits orders from distinguishing between businesses based on size. Requires orders to permit schools to remain open to maximum extent possible. Requires online publication of information justifying orders; prohibits officials from relying on other information to defend orders against legal challenge. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown fiscal effect on the state and local governments due to requirements that could change the use of shutdown orders during emergencies. (21-0018.)

1913. (21-0019)
ALLOWS A PARTY TO CHOOSE TO HAVE A JURY TRIAL IN CHILD-CUSTODY AND DEPENDENT-CHILD CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/12/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/11/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 05/26/2022

Proponent(s): Wylmina Hettinga, Stephen Konnoff

Allows a party in child custody cases to choose that a jury, rather than a judge, determines who receives legal custody of the child. Prohibits the judge from rejecting a jury’s decision in child-custody cases. Allows a party in dependent-child proceedings to choose that a jury, rather than a judge, determines whether a child should be declared a dependent of the court. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown ongoing net fiscal impact on state courts that would depend significantly on (1) how the measure is interpreted and implemented by the courts and (2) how individuals respond to the ability to demand a jury trial in child custody and juvenile dependency jurisdictional hearings. Potential ongoing increase in county costs that could reach the low millions of dollars annually related to juvenile dependency jurisdictional cases – some or all of which could be shifted to the state. (21-0019.)

1914. (21-0020)
ABOLISHES THE CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION AND TRANSFERS ITS DUTIES TO OTHER STATE AGENCIES. APPROPRIATES FUNDS FOR WILDFIRE VICTIMS FROM UNSPECIFIED STATE SOURCE. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/18/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/17/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 05/31/2022

Proponent(s): Adolfo Ramos

Amends the California Constitution to abolish the California Public Utilities Commission (which regulates privately owned electric, natural gas, telecommunications, water, railroad, rail transit, and passenger transportation companies) and requires the Legislature to reallocate the Commission’s functions, duties, and regulatory authority to other state agencies, departments, or boards. Creates a $90 million “Special Wildfire Victims’ Fund” (replenished annually and adjusted for inflation), appropriated from unspecified state funds and administered by the State Fire Chief, to assist wildfire victims with their housing, food, and other basic needs. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: About $90 million in one-time state costs to establish the Special Wildfire Victims Fund, plus annual state costs of up to tens of millions of dollars, depending on the severity of wildfire damage each year. One-time state costs in the low tens of millions of dollars to relocate California Public Utilities Commission staff to other state agencies. Ongoing net state savings of several million dollars annually or one-time state revenues of $100 million to $200 million, depending on use of the existing commission headquarters in San Francisco. (21-0020.)

1915. (21-0021)
MANDATES GOVERNMENT-ISSUED IDENTIFICATION TO VOTE AND SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER TO REGISTER. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 11/19/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/18/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 06/01/2022

Proponent(s): Carl DeMaio

Changes existing voter laws by requiring: (1) in-person voters to present a government-issued identification card; (2) mail-in voters to provide a government-issued identification card number and signature matching their voter file; and (3) all voters to provide a full Social Security number when they register to vote and to verify existing registrations. Amends Constitution to require, consistent with existing state and federal laws, that counties maintain accurate voter registration lists. Requires counties to report in-person voting wait times after each election. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time state and local government costs in the millions of dollars to update voter registrations. Increased annual state and local government costs, potentially in the tens of millions of dollars, to administer elections. (21-0021.)

1917. (21-0023)
INCREASES HOMEOWNERS’ REAL PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION AND PROVIDES SUPPLEMENTAL RENTERS’ TAX CREDIT. INCREASES TAXES ON HIGH-VALUE PROPERTIES. LIMITS LOCAL RESTRICTIONS ON HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/30/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/31/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 06/14/2022

Proponent(s): Stanley R. Apps

Increases the portion of a homeowner’s property value that is exempt from property tax, from $7,000 currently to $200,000 (adjusted for inflation). Provides up to $2,000 supplemental income tax credit for renters (adjusted for inflation). Reimburses local governments’ lost revenue from these tax changes by enacting new property tax surcharge of up to 1.4% on properties valued over $4 million. Limits local government discretion to deny certain proposed housing development projects. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased property taxes on property with a taxable value of more than $4 million providing $16 billion to $20 billion in new revenue. Increased state costs resulting from the increases to the homeowners’ property tax exemption and renters’ tax credit. Increased costs to local governments for carrying out the measure. Total costs would be about $15 billion annually and likely would be fully offset by revenue from increased property taxes on higher value properties. (21-0023.)

1918. (21-0024A1)
TRANSFERS CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY FOR WRITING STATEWIDE BALLOT-MEASURE SUMMARIES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/02/21 | Circulation Deadline: 05/31/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 06/14/2022

Proponent(s): Sam Blakeslee

Transfers the elected Attorney General’s constitutional and statutory authority to write summaries of statewide ballot measures for use in election materials and for collecting qualifying signatures to the Legislative Analyst, who is appointed by a joint committee of the Legislature. Eliminates existing requirement that summaries describe a measure’s chief purpose and points; instead, requires summaries describe the primary changes in law. Requires advisory committee to recommend changes to summaries for clarity. Requires Legislative Analyst to post on website documents it receives relating to ballot measures. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Depending on how the measure were implemented, there could be minor state savings or costs. (21-0024A1.)

1919. (21-0025A2)
LIMITS GOVERNMENT AUTHORITY TO PROTECT PUBLIC HEALTH AND PROHIBITS CERTAIN GOVERNMENT PUBLIC HEALTH MEASURES INCLUDING VACCINATION REQUIREMENTS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/03/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/01/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 06/17/2022

Proponent(s): Dean Lopato

Prohibits range of government public health measures, including vaccination requirements and fluoridation of drinking water. Repeals laws permitting governmental intervention if parents fail to provide necessary medical care to children. Creates new constitutional right called “medical freedom” and other new constitutional rights related to public health interventions and medical treatments. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Highly uncertain fiscal effects on state and local governments, ranging from relatively minor to very significant potential costs. The magnitude of the potential costs depends heavily on the way provisions of the measure would be interpreted by the courts, how certain provisions would be implemented, and how various economic sectors and individuals might respond in the long term. (21-0025A2)

1920. (21-0026A1)
LIMITS STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS’ ABILITY TO RAISE REVENUES FOR GOVERNMENT SERVICES. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 12/07/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 06/21/2022

Proponent(s): Thomas W. Hiltachk

For new state taxes, requires voter approval (added to current requirement that Legislature approve by two-thirds vote any taxes it proposes). For new local taxes, local governing body must approve by two-thirds any taxes it proposes, and voters’ approval must occur in a general election. Expands definition of “taxes” to include certain regulatory fees, broadening application of approval requirements. Requires Legislature or local governing body to approve all other fees by two-thirds vote. Requires that tax measures specifically limit how revenues may be spent. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Potentially substantially lower annual state and local revenues, depending on future actions of the Legislature, local governing bodies, voters, and the courts. (21-0026A1)

1922. (21-0028)
PROHIBITS FRACKING AND PHASES OUT USE OF OIL, NATURAL GAS, AND COAL. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/08/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 06/21/2022

Proponent(s): Kamyar Feiz

As of May 1, 2023, prohibits hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) and other processes used to increase oil and gas well production. Prohibits oil and gas extraction within “health protection zones,” including near hospitals, residential areas, or schools. Prohibits authorization of new oil and gas well operators; and, starting in 2025, prohibits new wells. Limits amounts that may be extracted from existing wells, with allowed amounts phasing out to zero by 2045. Starting in 2025, prohibits government agencies from using coal. Prohibits any use of fossil fuels starting in 2050. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Likely decrease in state tax and fee revenues over time that could reach several hundred million dollars annually, primarily from reduced state income tax and sales tax paid by oil and gas extraction businesses, their employees, and others with jobs induced by the oil and gas industry. Decreased local tax and fee revenues over time that could reach several hundred million dollars annually, including lower property assessment revenues from parcels with oil and gas deposits, as well as lower royalties from oil and gas production. Increased one-time state costs and cost pressures potentially totaling more than ten billion dollars over the next few decades to plug abandoned wells and compensate oil and gas companies for the reduction in value. Unknown fiscal effects from the prohibition on the consumption of fossil fuels that could range from relatively minor to substantial reductions in state and local revenues depending on several factors, including economic, policy, and technological changes. (21-0028.)

1923. (21-0029A1)
REQUIRES PRE-LAWSUIT NOTICE AND LIMITS PLAINTIFFS’ ATTORNEYS’ CONTINGENCY FEES IN CONSUMER PROTECTION AND TORT CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 06/28/2022

Proponent(s): Kyla Christoffersen Powell

Requires plaintiffs to provide 60 days’ notice and opportunity to settle before filing lawsuits for tort claims (for example, personal injury, product liability, negligence) or certain consumer-protection violations (for example, unfair competition, false advertising, warranty). Limits contingency fees that attorneys can charge prevailing plaintiffs in these cases to 20% of amount recovered. For specified consumer-protection claims, limits court-ordered attorneys’ fee awards to 20% of amount recovered. Does not restrict fee arrangements for defendants’ attorneys. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown net impact on state courts that would depend primarily on how attorneys, plaintiffs, and defendants respond to this measure, as well as how the measure is interpreted and implemented by the courts. (21-0029A1.)

1924. (21-0030A1)
LIMITS PLAINTIFFS’ ATTORNEYS’ CONTINGENCY FEES IN CONSUMER PROTECTION AND TORT CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 06/28/2022

Proponent(s): Kyla Christoffersen Powell

Limits the amount of contingency fees attorneys can charge prevailing plaintiffs for tort claims (for example, personal injury, product liability, negligence) and certain consumer-protection violations (for example, unfair competition, false advertising, warranty). Limits such contingency fee to 20% of the amount recovered by the plaintiff. For specified consumer-protection claims, limits court-ordered attorneys’ fee awards to 20% of amount recovered in the lawsuit. Does not restrict fee arrangements for defendants’ attorneys. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown net impact on state courts that would depend primarily on how attorneys, plaintiffs, and defendants respond to this measure. (21-0030A1.)

1925. (21-0031)
LIMITS PLAINTIFFS’ ATTORNEYS’ CONTINGENCY FEES IN TORT CASES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 06/28/2022

Proponent(s): Kyla Christoffersen Powell

Limits the amount of contingency fees attorneys can charge prevailing plaintiffs for tort claims (for example, personal injury, product liability, negligence). Limits such contingency fee to 20% of the amount recovered by the plaintiff. Does not restrict fee arrangements for defendants’ attorneys. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown net impact on state courts that would depend primarily on how attorneys, plaintiffs, and defendants respond to this measure. (21-0031.)

1926. (21-0032A1)
INCREASES HOMEOWNERS’ PROPERTY TAX EXEMPTION AND RENTERS’ TAX CREDIT. INCREASES TAXES ON HIGH-VALUE PROPERTIES. LIMITS LOCAL RESTRICTIONS ON HOUSING DEVELOPMENT. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 06/28/2022

Proponent(s): Stanley R. Apps

Increases portion of homeowner’s property value that is exempt from property tax from $7,000 to $200,000 (adjusted for inflation). Increases renters’ income tax credit to up to $2,000 (adjusted for inflation); increases income limit for claiming credit to up to $400,000. Reimburses local governments’ lost revenue from these changes with new property tax surcharge of up to 1.2% on properties valued over $4 million. Limits local government discretion to deny certain housing development projects. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased property taxes on property with a taxable value of more than $4 million providing $16 billion to $19 billion in new revenue. Increased state costs resulting from the increases to the homeowners’ property tax exemption and renters’ tax credit. Increased costs to local governments for carrying out the measure. Total costs would be $16 billion to $19 billion annually and likely would be fully offset by revenue from increased property taxes on higher value properties. (21-0032A1.)

1927. (21-0033A1)
AUTHORIZES ADDITIONAL LAWSUITS CHALLENGING PUBLIC EDUCATION POLICIES AND ACTIONS BY CREATING NEW CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHT. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 997,139
Failed: 06/28/2022

Proponent(s): Emelyn Rodriquez

Creates new constitutional right for all public school students in preschool through high school, including charter schools, to a “high-quality” education, the requirements of which will be defined by the courts. Allows lawsuits only by parents and certain nonprofit organizations representing students to enjoin or invalidate any law, regulation, policy, or action that allegedly violates this new right. Policies that do not “put the interests of students first,” which is not defined, are deemed to violate the new right. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Unknown litigation and court-related costs for the state and schools that would depend significantly on the number of lawsuits filed on behalf of public school students. (21-0033A1.)

1928. (21-0034A1)
AUTHORIZES BONDS TO FUND CLEANUP OF CONTAMINATED LAND AND WATER. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/14/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 06/28/2022

Proponent(s): Andre Quintero

Authorizes $2.7 billion in state general obligation bonds as follows: $1.7 billion to the Department of Toxic Substances Control ($1 billion to clean up contaminated sites, with priority to certain properties in Brisbane, Carson, El Monte, Lynwood, Newport Beach, Richmond, and Sacramento; $500 million to implement existing hazardous waste laws; $200 million to clean up schools); $600 million for grants to local governments and nonprofit organizations to acquire and remediate contaminated properties, including conversion to parks; $300 million for groundwater cleanup; $100 million for hazardous materials response. Appropriates money from General Fund to repay bonds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state costs of $4.3 billion to pay off principal ($2.7 billion) and interest ($1.6 billion) on bonds over the next 30 years. Annual payments would average about $140 million. (21-0034A1.)

1929. (21-0035A1)
REPEALS THREE STRIKES SENTENCING LAW. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/29/21 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/22 | Signatures Required: 623,212
Failed: 07/12/2022

Proponent(s): John Yahya Johnson, Earlonne Woods

Eliminates third-strike sentencing enhancement that currently imposes life imprisonment with possibility of parole for serious felony offenders with two or more prior serious or violent felony convictions. Eliminates second-strike sentencing enhancement that currently doubles sentence term for felony offenders with one prior serious or violent felony conviction. Requires resentencing of inmates who would have received lesser sentences under this measure. Maintains other sentencing enhancements for repeat offenders. Applies savings from sentencing changes to public school youth-mentoring programs, tuition assistance at California Community Colleges and California State University, and restorative justice and transitional housing programs. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Net state criminal justice system savings that could range from the low hundreds of millions of dollars to over $1 billion annually, which would be spent on education, restorative justice, and transitional housing. Temporary increase in county criminal justice system costs that could be in the tens of millions of dollars annually. (21-0035A1.)