This page contains a list of proposed initiative and referendum measures that during the last 60 days have been withdrawn by proponents or have failed to gather the required number of signatures during the circulation period. 


1939. (22-0005)
REFERENDUM CHALLENGING 2022 LAW AUTHORIZING CREATION OF COUNCIL TO SET MINIMUM WAGE AND WORKING STANDARDS FOR FAST-FOOD WORKERS.

Summary Date: 09/16/22
Final Random Sample Count: 01/24/23 (PDF)
QUALIFIED:
01/24/23 (PDF); VOIDED: 09/11/23 (PDF)
ELIGIBLE: 09/11/2023
Withdrawn: 12/29/2023 (PDF)
Signatures Required: 623,212
Proponent(s): Amber Evans, Steven McDermed

If the required number of registered voters sign this petition and it is timely filed, a 2022 law will not take effect unless approved at the next statewide general or special election after November 8, 2022. The challenged law:

  • Authorizes creation of Fast Food Council (upon submission of 10,000 fast-food worker signatures) to set working standards and minimum wage (up to $22/hour in 2023, with capped annual increases) at fast-food restaurants with 100+ nationwide locations;
  • Prohibits retaliation against fast-food workers for making certain workplace complaints.

1947. (23-0005)
REPEALS VOTER-ENACTED CHANGES TO PROPERTY TAX RULES FOR TRANSFERS BETWEEN FAMILY MEMBERS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 08/21/23 | Circulation Deadline: 02/20/24 | Signatures Required: 874,641
(25% of Signatures Reached 01/11/2024 (PDF))
Failed 03/04/2024
Proponent(s): Jon Coupal

Reinstates property tax reassessment rules for certain real property transfers between family members (including by inheritance), which voters eliminated through Proposition 19 in 2020, reducing local property tax revenues and eliminating funding source for Proposition 19’s California Fire Response Fund. Allows transfers to children (or grandchildren if parents are deceased) without property tax reassessment of: (1) principal residence, regardless of current value or continued use as principal residence; and (2) $1 million in other real property. Starting in 2025, properties assessed under Proposition 19 may be reassessed under reinstated rules. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Some owners of inherited properties would pay lower property taxes. This would reduce revenue for local governments and schools by several hundred million dollars per year in the first few years. These losses would grow over time, reaching $1.5 billion to $2 billion annually. (23-0005)

1948. (23-0006)
REQUIRES LANDFILL UPGRADES. AUTHORIZES ONLY SPECIFIED PRIVATE COMPANIES TO ADMINISTER UPGRADE FUNDING AND CERTAIN EDUCATION FUNDS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 09/06/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/04/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
Failed 03/18/2024
Proponent(s): Michael Freeman Liddell

Requires closed landfills to implement aerobic bioreactor technology that uses liquid and air to speed decomposition and reduce methane gas emissions. Prohibits state funding for required landfill upgrades and instead authorizes only NGD Consortium (consisting of several related private companies) to administer funding. Establishes funds, administered by NGD Consortium, for public schools and college savings accounts for students in communities with upgraded landfills; these funds will be financed by fines on noncompliant landfills and some of NGD Consortium’s profits from the measure’s programs. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state costs from administering new regulatory and funding programs likely totaling several millions of dollars annually. Uncertain local government cost impacts depending upon whether new requirements for landfills result in higher costs for providing waste collection and disposal services. Uncertain state and local government revenue impacts depending on a number of factors including the amount generated from various funding sources to support compliance for landfills and educational costs. (23-0006)

1949. (23-0007)
AUTHORIZES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURE GATHERING FOR INITIATIVE, REFERENDUM, AND RECALL PETITIONS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 09/06/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/04/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
Failed 03/18/2024
Proponent(s): Michael Freeman Liddell

Requires Secretary of State to develop an online platform allowing voters to view and sign electronically state and local initiative, referendum, and recall petitions on the Secretary of State’s website, or to download, print, and sign petitions for submission to the Secretary of State. Requires Secretary of State or local elections official to verify these signatures. Requires Secretary of State to invite arguments for and against initiative, referendum, and recall measures, and to post submitted arguments on its website. Requires Secretary of State’s website to include ongoing count of each measure’s signatures submitted electronically or via downloaded and printed petitions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: One-time state and local government costs in the tens of millions of dollars or more to develop an online system for electronic petition signature gathering. Ongoing annual costs of millions of dollars or more to maintain the new system. Potential net costs or savings due to changed state and local government processes for verifying petition signatures. (23-0007)

1950. (23-0008A1)
ALLOWS SMALLER SOLAR FARMS TO SELL ELECTRICITY WITHOUT BEING REGULATED BY THE STATE AS A PUBLIC UTILITY. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 09/06/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/04/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
Failed 03/18/2024
Proponent(s): Anthony s. Wexler, Jonathan D. Greenberg

Allows solar farms located on up to 100 acres of agricultural land to sell electricity within a two-mile radius service area without state regulation of utility safety or rates. Requires these solar farms to comply with safety and other county codes related to electric power systems. Prohibits these farms from using utility power lines without permission. Requires local utilities to provide electrical service on the same terms to existing customers who choose to receive electricity from these solar farms. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Potential costs to state and local governments of an uncertain magnitude should safety issues such as fires arise at solar farms. Potential uncertain fiscal effects for local governments depending primarily on the degree to which additional inspections are needed. (23-0008A1)

1951. (23-0009)
CONSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS ON PUBLIC EDUCATION. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 09/14/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/12/24 | Signatures Required: 874,641
Failed 03/25/2024
Proponent(s): James J. Cowie

Amends California Constitution to require the state and its school districts to “provide all public school students with high-quality public schools,” the requirements of which will depend on how the measure is implemented by the Legislature, state agencies, and public schools (including charter schools), and interpreted by court decisions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: No direct fiscal effects on the state or public schools because the measure does not require any change to current policies or programs. Depending on how the measure is legally interpreted by the courts and implemented by the state and public schools, there could be fiscal effects that are unknown and highly uncertain. (23-0009)

1952. (23-0010)
CONSTITUTIONAL REQUIREMENTS ON PUBLIC EDUCATION. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 09/14/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/12/24 | Signatures Required: 874,641
Failed 03/25/2024
Proponent(s): James J. Cowie

Amends California Constitution to provide that all “school-age children have the right to attend high-quality public schools,” the requirements of which will depend on how the measure is implemented by the Legislature, state agencies, and public schools (including charter schools), and interpreted by court decisions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: No direct fiscal effects on the state or public schools because the measure does not require any change to current policies or programs. Depending on how the measure is legally interpreted by the courts and implemented by the state and public schools, there could be fiscal effects that are unknown and highly uncertain. (23-0010)

1953. (23-0011)
LIMITS STATE’S ABILITY TO SET STATEWIDE LAND-USE AND HOUSING POLICY. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 09/18/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/18/24 | Signatures Required: 874,641
Failed 03/29/2024
Proponent(s): John Heath, Peggy Huang, Jovita Mendoza, Dennis Richards, Susan Candell, Anita Enander, Kalimah Priforce

Provides that local laws automatically override conflicting state land-use and zoning laws (including affordable housing laws), unless such state laws address specified statewide concerns. For state laws enacted after 2016 to prevail over local laws, they must include specific findings of statewide concern, which may require recent laws to be re-enacted or amended. Prohibits state from changing, granting, or denying funding to local governments based on their implementation of this measure. Repeals Article XXXIV of the California Constitution, which requires local voter approval for publicly funded low-rent housing projects. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Fiscal effects of the measure depend on future decisions by the cities and counties and therefore are unknown. (23-0011)

1954. (23-0012)
INCREASES STATE GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION GOALS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 09/18/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/18/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
Failed 03/29/2024
Proponent(s): Micah J. Perlin

Increases state’s target for reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions to 95% below 1990 levels by 2045 (instead of 85%). Removes current requirement that state use Cap-and-Trade Program (which sets overall limits and allows producers to buy and sell emissions credits) to achieve 2030 target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas production and refining. Instead, requires regulations that achieve the maximum feasible and cost-effective reduction to meet target. Allows local regulators to regulate carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources (e.g., refineries, factories, power plants) more strictly than the state. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state costs, totaling billions of dollars annually, to meet new greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets. Increased local government costs of an unknown magnitude to comply with new regulations adopted as a result of this measure. Potential reduction in various annual state and local government revenues of an uncertain amount depending on how the measure’s implementation impacts the oil and gas sector. (23-0012)

1955. (23-0013A1)
AUTHORIZES BONDS AND CREATES STATE AGENCY FOR PSYCHEDELIC THERAPY RESEARCH. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT AND STATUTE.

Summary Date: 09/22/23 | Circulation Deadline: 03/20/24 | Signatures Required: 874,641
Failed 04/03/2024
Proponent(s): Jeannie Fontana

Creates state agency to regulate “psychedelic medicines” (defined as substances that “produce altered states of consciousness,” including psilocybin, LSD, mescaline, MDMA, ketamine, cannabis). Requires agency provide funding for research, development, and delivery of psychedelic medicines and therapies for treatment of mental health conditions and health disorders, including anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Establishes constitutional “right to conduct research” using psychedelic medicines. Authorizes $5 billion in state general obligation bonds for agency funding, with $500 million annual limit. Appropriates money from General Fund to repay bonds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Average state costs of about $220 million each year for 30 years, with costs totaling $6.6 billion over the period. (23-0013A1)