Elections Code section 9034 requires that once proponent(s) of a proposed initiative measure have gathered 25% of the number of signatures required (currently 136,663 for an initiative statute and 218,661 for a constitutional amendment) proponent(s) must immediately certify that they have done so under penalty of perjury to the Secretary of State. 

Upon receipt of the certification, the Secretary of State must provide copies of the proposed initiative measure and the circulating title and summary to the Senate and the Assembly. Each house is required to assign the proposed initiative measure to its appropriate committees and hold joint public hearings, at least 131 days before the date of the election at which the measure is to be voted on. However, the Legislature cannot amend the proposed initiative measure or prevent it from appearing on the ballot. 


1947. (23-0005)
REPEALS VOTER-ENACTED CHANGES TO PROPERTY TAX RULES FOR TRANSFERS BETWEEN FAMILY MEMBERS. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT.

Summary Date: 08/21/23 | Circulation Deadline: 02/20/24 | Signatures Required: 874,641
(25% of Signatures Reached 01/11/2024 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Jon Coupal

Reinstates property tax reassessment rules for certain real property transfers between family members (including by inheritance), which voters eliminated through Proposition 19 in 2020, reducing local property tax revenues and eliminating funding source for Proposition 19’s California Fire Response Fund. Allows transfers to children (or grandchildren if parents are deceased) without property tax reassessment of: (1) principal residence, regardless of current value or continued use as principal residence; and (2) $1 million in other real property. Starting in 2025, properties assessed under Proposition 19 may be reassessed under reinstated rules. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Some owners of inherited properties would pay lower property taxes. This would reduce revenue for local governments and schools by several hundred million dollars per year in the first few years. These losses would grow over time, reaching $1.5 billion to $2 billion annually. (23-0005)

1959. (23-0017A1)
ALLOWS FELONY CHARGES AND INCREASES SENTENCES FOR CERTAIN DRUG AND THEFT CRIMES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 10/26/23 | Circulation Deadline: 04/23/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
(25% of Signatures Reached 01/24/2024 (PDF))

Proponent(s): Thomas W. Hiltachk

  • Allows felony charges for possessing certain drugs, including fentanyl, and for thefts under $950—both currently chargeable only as misdemeanors—with two prior drug or two prior theft convictions, as applicable. Defendants who plead guilty to felony drug possession and complete treatment can have charges dismissed.
  • Increases sentences for other specified drug and theft crimes.
  • Increased prison sentences may reduce savings that currently fund mental health and drug treatment programs, K-12 schools, and crime victims; any remaining savings may be used for new felony treatment program.

Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased state criminal justice system costs potentially in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually, primarily due to an increase in the state prison population. Some of these costs could be offset by reductions in state spending on local mental health and substance use services, truancy and dropout prevention, and victim services due to requirements in current law. Increased local criminal justice system costs potentially in the tens of millions of dollars annually, primarily due to increased court-related workload and a net increase in the number of people in county jail and under county community supervision. (23-0017A1)

1963. (23-0021A1)
RESTRICTS SPENDING BY HEALTH CARE PROVIDERS MEETING SPECIFIED CRITERIA. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/03/23 | Circulation Deadline: 05/01/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
(25% of Signatures Reached 12/12/2023 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Thomas Bannon

Requires certain health care providers to spend 98% of revenues from federal discount prescription drug program on direct patient care. Applies only to health care providers that: spent over $100,000,000 in any ten-year period on anything other than direct patient care; and operated multifamily housing with over 500 high-severity health and safety violations. Penalizes noncompliance by revoking health care licenses and tax-exempt status. Permanently authorizes state to negotiate Medi-Cal drug prices on statewide basis. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Increased costs to state government, potentially up to the millions of dollars annually, to review entities’ compliance with the measure and enforce the measure’s provisions. These costs would be paid for by fees created under the measure. Uncertain fiscal impacts to state and local government health programs, depending on how the affected entities respond to the measure’s requirements. (23-0021A1)

1964. (23-0022)
ADDS ONE-SEMESTER PERSONAL FINANCE COURSE TO HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/09/23 | Circulation Deadline: 05/07/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
(25% of Signatures Reached 12/12/2023 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Christopher Lee Kaufman, Timothy J. Ranzetta

Adds one-semester personal finance course to existing graduation requirements for public high school students (including those attending charter schools) beginning with the graduating class in 2030. Requires schools to begin offering the course by the 2026-27 school year. This course would be in addition to currently required one-semester economics course, which may—but is not required to—include personal finance curriculum. Students may fulfill new requirement by completing an existing University of California-approved personal finance course, or a new course approved by a school’s governing body. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Potential increased costs to schools that could reach in the high tens of millions of dollars annually in the first few years and then likely decline over time. Costs could be related to additional teachers, curriculum development, and instructional materials and would depend on how the measure is implemented. (23-0022)

1966. (23-0024A1)
PROVIDES PERMANENT FUNDING FOR MEDI-CAL HEALTH CARE SERVICES. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 11/13/23 | Circulation Deadline: 05/13/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
(25% of Signatures Reached 01/12/2024 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Christina Orr, Dustin Corcoran, Jodi Hicks

Makes permanent the existing tax on managed health care insurance plans, currently set to expire in 2026, which the state uses to pay for health care services for low-income families with children, seniors, people with disabilities, and other groups covered by the Medi-Cal program. Requires revenues to be used only for specified Medi-Cal services, including primary and specialty care, emergency care, family planning, mental health, and prescription drugs. Prohibits revenues from being used to replace other existing Medi-Cal funding. Caps administrative expenses and requires independent audits of programs receiving funding. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: Uncertain overall impact on state revenues and spending, including reduced legislative flexibility over the use of MCO tax funds. The extent of this impact depends on whether the measure would result in different state decisions around imposing, structuring, and spending proceeds from the managed care organization tax than in the absence of the measure. (23-0024A1)

1971. (23-0029A1)
EXPANDS STATE HEALTH CARE PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN WITH CERTAIN MEDICAL CONDITIONS. INITIATIVE STATUTE.

Summary Date: 12/27/23 | Circulation Deadline: 06/24/24 | Signatures Required: 546,651
(25% of Signatures Reached 01/26/2024 (PDF))
Proponent(s): Ann-Louise Kuhns

Expands California Children’s Services Program, which provides health care to low-middle income children under 21 with specified medical conditions, by requiring state to provide:

  • financial assistance to families not eligible for Program services for certain out-of-pocket treatment costs for covered conditions;
  • new annual grants to hospitals that provide Program services;
  • increased payment rates for physicians that are at least the federal Medicare rate; and
  • coverage for additional medical conditions including cancer, heart disease, certain infectious diseases, and cerebral palsy that are currently covered only by regulation, not by statute.

Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local governments: State General Fund cost potentially ranging in the hundreds of millions of dollars to around a billion dollars each year to assist families with the cost of health care for children with qualifying serious and chronic diseases, as well as to increase payments to providers in the California Children’s Services program.  (23-0029A1)