Initiatives and Referenda Failed to Qualify

Proposed initiative and referendum measures that have not gathered the required number of signatures during the circulation period fail to qualify for the ballot. This page contains a list of proposed initiative and referendum measures that have failed to qualify for the ballot during the last 60 days.

 

1699. (15-0037)
California Nationhood. Initiative Statute. 
Summary Date: 09/14/2015 | Failed: 03/25/16
Louis J Marinelli  ljmarinelli@sovereignca.org

Places question of whether California should become a separate nation on the ballot every four years, beginning November 2020. Voter approval of nationhood in any such election would then require California to demand federal recognition as a separate nation and distinct society. Federal government refusal to recognize California’s nationhood would require future placement on the ballot, every four years, the second question of whether California should unilaterally declare independence from the United States. Voter approval of unilateral independence from the United States in any such election would require California to declare independence and request admission to the United Nations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potentially large changes in California public budgets, assuming that this measure can be implemented legally, that voters approve changes to California’s relationship with the United States in later elections, and that these changes actually occur. (15-0037.) (Full Text)

1700. (15-0039)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 09/16/2015 | Failed: 03/25/16
John Lee, Sandra Bacon-Tercero, Dege Coutee, Edie Lerman, Dave Hodges, J. David Nick, Omar Figueroa, Russell Goodrow, Michael Grafton, Jason Browne, Shona Gochenaur, Gregory Fuentes, Teresa Randolph, Lanette Davies, Denise Dorey, Richard Miller, Jason Bennett, Marc Baylen, Gregory Ledbetter, Patricia Smith, Jon Martinelli, Ron Mullins, Elihu Hernandez, Heather Burke, Gilbert Canedo, john@afpr.us

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Creates commission to regulate and license marijuana industry. Applies general retail sales taxes to marijuana, unless medical or dietary exemptions apply. Permits excise taxes on certain marijuana sales, up to 15% of retail price, and storage, up to 10% of wholesale price. Prohibits discrimination based on marijuana use. Bars marijuana testing for job applicants and employees, or penalizing employees for off-duty use, unless they are in safety-sensitive occupations. Permits local regulation of marijuana businesses, including ban or cap with voter approval. Exempts medical marijuana collectives from licensing and local zoning. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, most of which would be required to be spent for specific purposes such as education, public safety, and drug abuse education and treatment. (15-0039.) (Full Text)

1701. (15-0040)
Abortion Access Restriction. Parental Notification and Waiting Period for Females Under 18. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 09/17/2015 |Failed: 03/28/16
Stephen Hicks steve@caparentalrights.org

Changes California Constitution to prohibit certain currently authorized trained and licensed medical professionals from providing abortions to unemancipated minors. Prohibits abortion for unemancipated minor until 48 hours after physician notifies parent/legal guardian in writing. Provides exceptions for medical emergency, parental waiver, or parental abuse documented by notarized statement from law enforcement or relatives. Permits judge to waive notice if minor appears personally in court and proves maturity or best interest. Requires specific abortion information reported to State. Physicians subject to suit for 12 years. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State administrative costs of at least $1 million, and potentially several million dollars, annually. Uncertain net fiscal impact on state health and social services programs, potentially in the millions of dollars annually, to the extent the measure results in changes to the abortion and/or birth rates in the state. (15-0040.) (Full Text)

1702. (15-0041)
Medical Marijuana. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 09/17/2015 | Failed: 03/28/16
Clarence Phillip Snider 12mostlyfriends@gmail.com

Establishes a state constitutional right for California residents 18 years of age or older to grow, own, purchase, and sell organic marijuana for medical use, without a doctor’s recommendation or prescription. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net reduced costs to state and local governments, possibly reaching the tens of millions of dollars annually related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Potential additional state and local tax revenues, primarily from sales taxes, in the low hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Additional state costs of up to several tens of millions of dollars annually to administer permits to sell medical marijuana, which would be offset by any permitting fees authorized by the state. (15-0041.) (Full Text)

1703. (15-0042)
Initiative and Referendum Petitions. Electronic Signature Gathering. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 09/21/2015 | Failed: 04/06/16
Barton C. Gilbert bartgilbert@sovereignca.org

Authorizes electronic signature gathering for initiative and referendum petitions. Requires county elections officials to establish a digital platform to accept and process registered voters’ digital signatures, scanned thumbprints, and personal identification numbers for use in signing petitions. Prohibits election officials from discriminating between handwritten or electronic signatures. Permits proponents, at their own cost, to translate and circulate petitions in any language. Requires legislators to pay, from personal funds, the same fee to introduce legislation as proponents pay to obtain a title and summary from the Attorney General. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased costs to state and local governments to administer the initiative process. These costs include (1) one-time costs—possibly tens of millions of dollars—to state and local governments to develop new information technology systems and (2) ongoing costs to local governments of possibly millions of dollars each year. Ongoing fiscal effect on state government is not certain and depends on future decisions and actions by lawmakers. (15-0042.) (Full Text)

1704. (15-0043, Amdt. #1)
Property Tax Surcharge to Fund Poverty Reduction Programs. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute.
Summary Date: 09/21/2015 | Failed: 04/06/16
Jim Mangia, Martine Singer, Conway Collis, and Dixon Slingerland c/o Stephen Kaufman and George Yin (213) 452-6576

Imposes additional surcharge on real property with an assessed value of over $3 million. Surcharge based on a sliding scale ranging from three-tenths of one percent for real property assessed at $3 million to eight-tenths of one percent for real property assessed at $10 million or more. Allocates revenue to numerous programs for the purpose of reducing poverty, including: prenatal services, expanded childcare, early childhood education, after-school and summer programs, job training grants, tax credits, and monetary aid. Surcharge expires in 20 years. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased state revenues annually through 2036-37—estimated between $6 billion and $7 billion in 2017-18—from a new surcharge on high-value properties, with the revenues dedicated to various programs intended to reduce poverty. (15-0043.)(Full Text)

1705. (15-0044)
Medical Marijuana. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 09/23/2015 | Failed: 04/06/16
Craig Beresh, Jeffrey Byrne, Lanette Davies, Richard Fenton, Kandice Hawes, Donna Lambert, Eric Salerno, Deborah Tharp, Randall Welty, Dege Coutee, Van Ton, Rowola Maharaj, Shona Gochenaur, Marcia Blount, Richard Miller, Kimberly Cargile, Brook Hilton, and Andrew Merkel

Bars state and local laws restricting patients’ ability to obtain, cultivate, or transport medical marijuana, including concentrated cannabis, in any way that does not apply equally to other plants, unless the activities are within 600 feet of a school. Bars state and local laws creating noncompetitive markets for medical marijuana. Broadens definition of marijuana under state law to include all parts of, and anything made from, the marijuana plant. Bars state and local laws restricting doctors’ ability to recommend marijuana to patients in any way that does not apply equally to herbal or therapeutic treatments. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential increase in tax revenue related to sales of medical marijuana of tens of millions of dollars annually, depending on how the measure is interpreted by the courts. (15-0044.) (Full Text)

1706. (15-0045)
Legislature Expansion. Legislative Process. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 09/28/2015 | Failed: 04/14/16
John Cox (847) 274-8814

Increases size of Legislature almost 100-fold by dividing current Assembly and Senate districts into neighborhood districts such that each Assemblymember represents about 5,000 persons and each Senator represents about 10,000 persons. Provides for neighborhood district representatives to elect working committees the size of the current Assembly and Senate, 80 Assemblymembers and 40 Senators. Gives working committees the legislative power generally, and sole power to amend bills, but requires approval by appropriate vote of the full membership in each house for passage of any non-urgency bill. Reduces legislators’ pay and expenditures. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Decreased state spending on the Legislature of over $140 million annually. Increased county election costs, potentially in the range of tens of millions of dollars initially and significantly lower amounts annually thereafter. (15-0045.) (Full Text)

1707. (15-0046)
Chief of Protocol of California. International Diplomacy. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/01/2015 | Failed: 04/14/16
Sam Chaney and Stuart Webb samchaney@sovereignca.org stuartwebb@sovereignca.org

Establishes new Office of the Chief of Protocol to advance the foreign policy goals of California. Requires the Secretary of State to appoint a Chief of Protocol who would advise the Governor, the Lieutenant Governor, and the Secretary of State on matters of national and international diplomatic protocol. Requires the Chief of Protocol to handle certain official diplomatic activities, including planning programs for certain visiting foreign leaders; accompanying the Governor on official visits abroad; representing the Governor at certain diplomatic events; and helping to establish embassies in California and abroad. Requires California to extend diplomatic recognition to member states of the United Nations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown increase in state costs due to the considerable uncertainties surrounding implementation of this measure. (15-0046.) (Full Text)

1708. (15-0047)
Abortion Access Restriction. Parental Notification and Waiting Period for Females Under 18. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 10/16/2015 | Failed: 04/28/16
John Smith john.smith.jsjs@gmail.com

Changes California Constitution to prohibit certain currently authorized trained and licensed medical professionals from providing abortions to unemancipated minors. Prohibits abortion for unemancipated minor until 48 hours after physician notifies parent/legal guardian in writing. Provides exceptions for medical emergency, parental waiver, or parental abuse documented by notarized statement from law enforcement or relatives. Permits judge to waive notice if minor appears personally in court and proves maturity or best interest. Requires specific abortion information reported to State. Physicians subject to suit for 12 years. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State administrative costs of at least $1 million, and potentially several million dollars, annually. Uncertain net fiscal impact on state health and social services programs, potentially in the millions of dollars annually, to the extent the measure results in changes to the abortion and/or birth rates in the state. (15-0047.) (Full Text)

1710. (15-0048, Amdt. #1)
Three Strikes Law. Pre-1994 Strikes. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/19/2015 | Failed: 04/28/16
Julie Piccolotti (650) 503-6751

Provides that serious or violent felonies committed before passage of the three strikes law in 1994 do not count as strikes toward three strikes sentencing. Drops definition of crimes that count as strikes for purpose of three strikes law. Makes changes to the law that allowed resentencing for certain three strikes inmates; does not extend expired deadline to petition for resentencing. Declares that purpose of imprisonment includes rehabilitation. Removes crime of criminal threats and some first-degree burglaries from list of serious felonies that may not be plea-bargained. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net state savings related to prison and parole operations that would likely range from the low- to mid-hundreds of millions of dollars annually. Increased county costs that could exceed one hundred million dollars annually, primarily due to increased county jail and community supervision operations. (15-0048.) (Full Text)

1713. (15-0051)
Federal Elections. Campaign Advertisements. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/28/2015 | Withdrawn: 04/28/16
Timothy D. Geist (805) 319-9768

Permits political advertisers in federal elections for President, Vice-President, United States Senate, or House of Representatives to certify voluntarily, under penalty of perjury, the truth of their advertisement. Provides for certification to be filed with the county elections office where the advertisement is published via Internet, radio, television, or bulk mailing. Requires advertisements and accompanying certifications to be publicly available on a State-protected Internet site. Punishes false certifications with up to four years imprisonment. Delays prosecutions for false certifications until after the general election. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased costs to state and local governments. These costs include (1) one-time costs—possibly tens of millions of dollars—to develop new information technology systems and (2) ongoing costs to state and local governments of possibly millions of dollars each year to administer and enforce the new certification process. (15-0051.)(Full Text)

1711. (15-0049, Amdt. #1)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/26/2015 | Failed: 05/10/16
Alice A. Huffman (916) 498-1898

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Designates the State Board of Equalization to regulate and license the marijuana industry, including medical marijuana. Provides certain exemptions for medical marijuana patients and caregivers. Imposes 10% taxes on transactions at each of the producer, processor, and retailer stages, including for medical marijuana. Allows 25 square feet of cultivation and one ounce of possession for personal consumption by persons 21 and over. Permits local regulation and taxation of marijuana businesses. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually from taxes on the production and sale of marijuana, a portion of which is required to be spent on substance abuse education, prevention, research, and healthcare, and regulation of commercial marijuana activities. (15-0049.) (Full Text)

1712. (15-0050)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/28/2015 | Failed: 05/10/16
Berton Duzy and Michael Jolson (805) 402-1212 or (831) 252-4637

Legalizes marijuana and hemp under state law. Requires case-by-case review of charges or convictions for nonviolent marijuana offenses for possible sentence modification, amnesty, or immediate release from prison, jail, parole, or probation, and for possible clearance of criminal records. Requires Legislature to adopt laws to license and tax commercial marijuana sales. Allows doctors to approve or recommend marijuana for patients, regardless of age. Allows medical marijuana patients to designate collectives or dispensaries as primary caregivers. Limits testing for marijuana for employment or insurance purposes. Bars state or local aid to enforce federal marijuana laws. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana and industrial hemp, a portion of which is required to be spent on marijuana-related research and other activities. (15-0050.) (Full Text)

1714. (15-0052A2)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/29/2015 | Failed: 05/17/16
Chad M. Hines and Marinda D. Hanes (415) 915-5420

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Creates commission to license and regulate marijuana industry. Establishes procedures for resentencing of persons convicted of nonviolent marijuana offenses. Imposes state excise tax on marijuana of $.42 per gram of dried marijuana and $2.00 per gram of concentrated marijuana. Imposes temporary additional state excise tax of 2.5% on marijuana retail sales. Permits local taxes of up to 10% on marijuana sales, with voter approval. Provides for collection of marijuana taxes by Board of Equalization. Exempts medical marijuana from some taxation. Limits local regulation of marijuana. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, most of which is designated to be spent on drug education and counseling services, state parks, research related to the medical use of marijuana, and regulation of commercial marijuana activities. (15-0052.)(Full Text)

1715. (15-0053)
Nonpartisan Ballots. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 10/29/2015 | Failed: 05/17/16
Terrance Lynn contact@theterrylynn.com

Bars candidates for United States Congress or state elective office from listing their political party preference, or lack of political party preference, on the election ballot. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: No direct fiscal effect on state or local governments. (15-0053.)(Full Text)

1716. (15-0054)
Minimum Drinking Age. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/29/2015 | Failed: 05/17/16
Terrance Lynn contact@theterrylynn.com

Lowers the minimum legal drinking age in California from 21 to 18. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduction in federal highway funds totaling roughly $200 million dollars annually. Increased state and local tax revenues associated with the sale of alcoholic beverages totaling possibly several million dollars annually. (15-0054.)(Full Text)

1717. (15-0055)
Nuclear Power. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/29/2015 | Failed: 05/17/16
Ben Davis, Jr. (916) 833-7894

Extends statutory preconditions, currently applicable to new operation of any nuclear powerplant, to existing Diablo Canyon Power Plant. Before further electricity production at any plant, requires California Energy Commission to find federal government has approved technology for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste. For nuclear powerplants requiring reprocessing of fuel rods, requires Commission to find federal government has approved technology for nuclear fuel rod reprocessing plants. Both findings are subject to Legislature’s rejection. Further requires Commission to find on case-by-case basis facilities will be available with adequate capacity to reprocess or store powerplant’s fuel rods. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential impacts on state and local finances in the form of decreased revenues and increased costs due to possible electricity price increases and state liabilities. The magnitude of these impacts are uncertain, but could be significant, depending in part on the need for system upgrades for replacement power and whether the state is liable for investment losses. Potential avoidance of major future state and local government costs and lost revenues in the rare event of a major nuclear power plant incident. (15-0055.)(Full Text)

1718. (15-0056)
Electricity. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/29/2015 | Failed: 05/17/16
Ben Davis, Jr. (916) 833-7894

Establishes publicly-owned California Electrical Utility District to provide electric service, replacing most investor-owned utilities, such as PG&E, Southern California Edison, San Diego Gas & Electric, and Bear Valley Electric. Exempts publicly-owned electric utilities, unless they voluntarily elect to join. Requires the District be divided into 11 wards, approximately equal in population. Establishes an 11 member board of directors—one member per ward—each elected for 4-year terms. Grants the District the power to acquire property, construct facilities necessary to supply electricity, set electricity rates, impose taxes, and issue bonds. Fiscal impact: It is the opinion of the Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance that the measure would result in a substantial net change in state and local finances. (15-0056.) (Full Text)

1719. (15-0057, Amdt.#1)
Election Campaign Finance. Public Funding. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/06/2015 | Failed: 05/17/16
Alison Hartson (714) 878-9662 alisontakesaction@gmail.com

Repeals ban on public funding of election campaigns. Directs Legislature to create a public financing system for elections. Delays effective date of any such legislation until after the next election of the Legislature, unless there is no cost to taxpayers. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potentially significant state and local government costs to provide public funds to pay for campaigns and other unknown fiscal effects. Increased state and local government costs—possibly exceeding $1 million annually—to administer amended campaign laws, offset by increased fine revenue. (15-0057.) (Full Text)

1720. (15-0058)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/09/2015 | Failed: 05/25/16
Sam H. Clauder II (707) 656-4367 ccuc2016@gmail.com

Legalizes marijuana and hemp under state law. Imposes sales and use taxes on marijuana, including some medical marijuana. Allows Legislature to adopt laws to license and tax commercial marijuana activities. Creates commission to make recommendations to the Legislature. Permits some local regulation of marijuana possession, cultivation, or consumption. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to the low hundreds of millions of dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, some of which would be required to be spent for specific purposes including regulating the marijuana industry and education, research, and substance abuse counseling and education services. (15-0058.)(Full Text)

1721. (15-0059)
Childhood Sexual Abuse. Statutes of Limitations. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/09/2015 | Failed: 05/25/16
William Lynch (415) 307-6004 will@riseaboveabuse.org

Eliminates statute of limitations for civil actions based on childhood sexual abuse committed on or after the effective date of the measure. Eliminates statute of limitations for felony prosecutions for certain sexual crimes committed against children on or after the effective date of the measure, and for such crimes committed before the effective date of the measure for which the statute of limitations has not yet expired. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Probably minor increase in costs to the state courts, as well as the state and local criminal justice system, from an increase in cases filed and individuals convicted. The fiscal impact on local governments related to civil claims is not likely to be significant on a statewide basis, but the effect on individual local government entities could vary substantially. (15-0059.) (Full Text)

1722. (15-0060)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/10/2015 | Failed: 05/25/16
Sam H. Clauder II (707) 656-4367 ccuc2016@gmail.com

Legalizes marijuana and hemp under state law. Imposes sales and use taxes on marijuana, including some medical marijuana. Allows Legislature to adopt laws to license and tax commercial marijuana activities. Creates commission to make recommendations to the Legislature. Permits some local regulation of marijuana possession, cultivation, or consumption. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to the low hundreds of millions of dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, some of which would be required to be spent for specific purposes including regulating the marijuana industry and education, research, and substance abuse counseling and education services. (15-0060.) (Full Text)

1723. (15-0061)
Sales Tax on Political Advertisements. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 11/12/2015 | Failed: 05/25/16
Terrance Lynn contact@theterrylynn.com

Imposes a 1,000 percent sales tax on political advertising delivered within the State of California. Political advertising includes, but is not limited to, all media spending by political parties, political action committees, or candidates. Requires that proceeds of the tax be used for public education. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown increase in state revenues to be provided to public educational entities, assuming that the measure is allowed to go into effect after voter approval and any court challenges. (15-0061.) (Full Text)

1726. (15-0064)
Public Assistance Benefits. Eligibility. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/16/2015 | Failed: 05/27/16
Ted Hilton

Requires adult applicants for public assistance benefits to have California driver’s license or identification card and child applicants to have birth certificate and social security card. Requires counties and the state to retain copies of such identification documents and monitor subsequent submissions. Requires certain beneficiaries to seek employment for the entire period during which that beneficiary is receiving benefits. Requires additional state and county steps to identify and facilitate employment for those beneficiaries. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Annual state and local savings, potentially in the hundreds of millions of dollars, from reduced caseloads in the California Work Opportunity and Responsibility to Kids (CalWORKs) program and other public social services programs. Annual state and local costs at least in the tens of millions of dollars to implement a job placement program for CalWORKs recipients and administer additional documentation requirements. One-time state costs in the tens of millions of dollars for various changes to state information technology systems. (15-0064.) (Full Text)

1729. (15-0068A2)
Campaign Finance. Donor Disclosure. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute.
Summary Date: 11/20/2015 | Failed: 06/01/16
Jim Heerwagen c/o Gary Winuk (916) 446-2300

Creates a constitutional right to public disclosure of money used to finance campaign activity and influence government actions. Requires corporations and nonprofit organizations that spend $50,000 or more on political activities in California to disclose their $10,000 donors, including where donations passed through other entities. Requires that a political campaign’s advertisements disclose its top three donors contributing $50,000 or more. Expands Secretary of State’s online campaign finance database. Extends bar against former legislators lobbying Legislature or state agencies to 24 months. Requires disclosure of lobbying for government contracts. Increases penalties for Political Reform Act violations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased costs to state and local governments to administer state campaign finance and disclosure laws. These costs include (1) one-time costs—possibly tens of millions of dollars—to state and local governments to develop new information technology systems and (2) ongoing costs to state and local governments of possibly millions of dollars each year. These costs would be offset to some extent by higher fines. (15-0068.) (Full Text)

1730. (15-0069)
Medical Marijuana. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/25/2015 | Failed: 06/06/16
Roger D. Morgan, Scott Chipman, Carla Lowe, and Ron Allen (916) 434-5629 rogermorgan339@gmail.com

Bans all privately owned medical marijuana cultivation sites and dispensaries. Creates state-owned/operated dispensaries, and a single state-owned/operated site for medical marijuana cultivation, testing, and processing. Allows local governments to ban or restrict the number and location of state-owned dispensaries. Establishes packaging, lab testing, and potency standards for medical marijuana. Sets minimum age for medical marijuana use, at 21. Requires adoption of strict standards to govern physician medical marijuana recommendations for their patients. Specifies marijuana blood-content levels that establish driving under the influence. Retains current prohibition on recreational use of marijuana. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown change in state and local revenues related to sales of medical marijuana depending on how the measure is implemented by the state. Increased state costs of millions to tens of millions of dollars annually to implement a program to educate K-12 students and their teachers and parents regarding marijuana use. (15-0069.) (Full Text)

1731. (15-0070A1)
Tax to Fund Education, Healthcare, and Child Development. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 11/25/2015 |  Failed: 06/06/16
Cass Trinidad Gualvez and Dietmar Grellman c/o Barry Fadem (925) 283-0581 bfadem1@aol.com

Permanently establishes the temporary personal income tax increases enacted in 2012 for annual earnings over $290,000, currently set to expire in 2018. Imposes new personal income tax on annual earnings over $1 million. Allocates these tax revenues 50% to K-12 education, community colleges, and universities; 40% to healthcare for low-income individuals; and 10% to childcare and child development programs. Excludes these revenues from Proposition 98 funding requirements. Establishes a reserve fund, capped at 20% of the annual revenues, for use during state budget emergencies. Requires annual audit of expenditures. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased state revenues annually beginning in 2019—likely in the $7 billion to $15 billion range initially—with amounts varying based on stock market and economic trends. These revenues generally would be spent on education and health programs, with a small portion deposited annually to a reserve fund. (15-0070.) (Full Text)

1732. (15-0072)
Constitutional Definition of a Person. Fertilized Human Eggs. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/07/2015 | Failed: 06/17/16
Walter B. Hoye II and Lori Hoye civilrights@civilrightsfoundation.org (510) 225-4056

Extends constitutional protections of due process and equal protection to all fertilized human eggs by redefining “person” as including each and every human organism from the commencement of biological development. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potentially significant net costs to state and local governments from the establishment of due process and equal protection rights for zygotes, embryos, and fetuses. (15-0072.) (Full Text)

1733. (15-0073)
Speech. Holocaust Denial Restrictions. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/07/2015 | Failed: 06/17/16
Gregory Foulkes (949) 973-0975 grefou@gmail.com

Restricts speech that lobbies against the recognition of the Jewish, Armenian, or Ukrainian Holocausts at any school, educational institution, or museum that receives state funds. Prevents Holocaust denial organizations, as defined, from disseminating information and conducting activities on the premises of these institutions, or involving the employees, clients, or students of these institutions. Permits injunctive relief and damages against the Holocaust denial organizations that commit violations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Given its restraint on free speech, a court may find this measure unconstitutional. If so, it would have no fiscal effect. If the measure could be implemented legally, the annual cost to state-funded educational institutions is unlikely to be significant statewide, but the cost for a particular local government in a particular year might be significant if it is sued and found to have violated the provisions of the measure. (15-0073.) (Full Text)

1735. (15-0075A1)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Failed: 06/17/16
Dale Sky Jones and Alice A. Huffman (510) 251-1544

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Creates office and commission to license and regulate marijuana industry. Imposes state taxes of $2 per square foot of marijuana cultivation, $1 to $15 per ounce of marijuana production, 10% of retail sales price for edible marijuana products and concentrated extracts, and 5% for other retail sales. Imposes additional 5% local tax on retail sales. Exempts medical marijuana from some taxation. Provides for collection of taxes by State Board of Equalization. Authorizes resentencing and destruction of records for prior marijuana convictions. Allows limited local regulation of marijuana. Eases state restrictions on industrial hemp farming. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Additional state and local tax revenues potentially ranging from the high hundreds of millions of dollars to over $1 billion annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, most of which would be required to be spent for specific purposes such as education, environmental protection, marijuana-related research, and substance use treatment. (15-0075.) (Full Text)

1736. (15-0078A1)
Public School Teachers. Waiting Period for Permanent Status. School Employment Decisions. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Failed: 06/17/16
Heidi L. Gallegos and Stephen J. Cox (209) 954-9001

Increases length of service required before a teacher may become a permanent employee, from two consecutive school years to five consecutive school years. Gives local public school boards sole authority to set policies for, and ends collective bargaining over, teacher transfers, reassignments, layoffs, or re-employment, and the start date of the school year and hours in the school day. Prohibits seniority as a primary consideration in such policy decisions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Local educational agencies (LEAs) likely would experience net higher costs in the low tens of millions of dollars statewide due to conducting more frequent teacher evaluations and having to modify their employment policies. LEAs might incur various other fiscal effects relating to teacher compensation, teacher turnover, collective bargaining, and employment hearings, but the net impact of all these factors is difficult to determine. (15-0078.) (Full Text)

1737. (15-0079A1)
Public School Teachers. Waiting Period for Permanent Status. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Failed: 06/17/16
Heidi L. Gallegos and Stephen J. Cox (209) 954-9001

Increases length of service required before a teacher may become a permanent employee, from two consecutive school years to five consecutive school years. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Local educational agencies (LEAs) likely would experience net higher costs in the low tens of millions of dollars statewide due to conducting more frequent teacher evaluations. LEAs might incur various other fiscal effects relating to teacher compensation, teacher turnover, and dismissal hearings, but the net impact of all these factors is difficult to determine. (15-0079.) (Full Text)

1738. (15-0076A1)
Public Employees. Pension and Retiree Healthcare Benefits. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Failed: 06/17/16
Chuck Reed, Stephanie Gomes, Carl DeMaio, Pat Moris, Bill Kampe, and Tom Tait (415) 732-7700

Amends California Constitution to impose restrictions on pension and retiree healthcare benefits for new public employees, including those working in K-12 schools, higher education, hospitals, and police protection. Bars government employers from enrolling public employees hired after January 1, 2019 in defined benefit pension plans, from enhancing certain retirement benefits for such employees, and from paying more than one-half cost of such employees’ pension and retiree healthcare benefits, unless first approved by voters. Limits retirement boards’ ability to place financial conditions upon government employers that close defined benefit plans to new employees. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Significant effects—savings and costs—on state and local governments relating to compensation for governmental employees. The magnitude and timing of these effects would depend heavily on future decisions made by voters, governmental employers, the Legislature, Governor, and the courts. (15-0076.) (Full Text)

1739. (15-0077A1)
Public Employees. Pension and Retiree Healthcare Benefits. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Failed: 06/17/16
Chuck Reed, Stephanie Gomes, Carl DeMaio, Pat Moris, Bill Kampe, and Tom Tait (415) 732-7700

Amends California Constitution to impose restrictions on employer contributions toward cost of pension and retiree healthcare benefits for new public employees, including those working in K-12 schools, higher education, hospitals, and police protection. Bars government employers from contributing amount more than 11% of an employee’s base compensation (13% for safety employees) toward cost of pension and retiree healthcare benefits for public employees hired after January 1, 2019, and from paying more than one-half cost of such new public employees’ pension and retiree healthcare benefits, unless higher portion is first approved by voters. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Significant effects—savings and costs—on state and local governments relating to compensation for governmental employees. The magnitude and timing of these effects would depend heavily on future decisions made by voters, governmental employers, the Legislature, Governor, and the courts. (15-0077.) (Full Text)

1695. (15-0032)
Minimum Wage. Increases and Future Adjustments. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 07/31/2015 | Withdrawn: 06/23/16
Steve Trossman and Arianna Jimenez c/o Amber Maltbie (213) 612-7803

Under existing law, California’s minimum wage will increase from $9.00 per hour to $10.00 per hour on January 1, 2016. This measure increases the minimum wage to $11.00 per hour, effective January 1, 2017, and by $1.00 each of the next four years, to $15.00 per hour on January 1, 2021. Thereafter, adjusts the minimum wage annually based on the rate of inflation for the previous year, using the California Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Change in annual state and local tax revenues potentially ranging from a loss of hundreds of millions of dollars to a gain of more than $1 billion. Changes in state revenues would affect required state budget reserves, debt payments, and funding for schools and community colleges. Increase in state and local government spending totaling billions of dollars per year. (15-0032.) (Full Text)

1740. (15-0082A2)
Sports-Based Markets. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/15/2015 | Failed: 06/24/16
Zack Ward (705) 772-7066 system@thenewsportseconomy.com

Establishes right for any California resident, 18 years or older, to trade on responsible, carefully regulated, non-gambling, and socially beneficial sports markets. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown fiscal impact on state and local governments depending on how the measure is interpreted and implemented. (15-0082.) (Full Text)