Circulating Initiatives with 25% of Signatures Reached

Elections Code section 9034 requires that once proponent(s) of a proposed initiative measure have gathered 25% of the number of signatures required (currently 91,740 for an initiative statute and 146,352 for a constitutional amendment) proponent(s) must immediately certify that they have done so under penalty of perjury to the Secretary of State. 

Upon receipt of the certification, the Secretary of State must provide copies of the proposed initiative measure and the circulating title and summary to the Senate and the Assembly. Each house is required to assign the proposed initiative measure to its appropriate committees and hold joint public hearings, at least 131 days before the date of the election at which the measure is to be voted on. However, the Legislature cannot amend the proposed initiative measure or prevent it from appearing on the ballot. 

 

1806. (17-0010)
Authorizes Bonds to Fund Projects for Water Supply and Quality, Watershed, Fish, Wildlife, Water Conveyance, and Groundwater Sustainability and Storage. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 09/20/17 | Circulation Deadline: 03/19/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 11/01/2017 (PDF))
Proponents: Gerald H. Meral (415) 717-8412 jerrymeral@gmail.com

Authorizes $8.877 billion in state general obligation bonds for various infrastructure projects: $3.03 billion for safe drinking water and water quality, $2.895 billion for watershed and fisheries improvements, $940 million for habitat protection, $855 million for improved water conveyance, $685 million for groundwater sustainability/storage, and $472 million for surface water storage/dam repairs. Appropriates money from General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources; gives priority to disadvantaged communities. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State costs of $17.3 billion to pay off principal ($8.9 billion) and interest ($8.4 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $433 million. Annual payments would be lower than this average in the initial and final few years, and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Varying fiscal effects on individual local governments depending on specific projects undertaken, amount of grants and loans received, and amount of local cost-share required. (17-0010.)

1809. (17-0013A1)
Changes Requirements for Certain Property Owners to Transfer Their Property Tax Base to Replacement Property. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute.
Summary Date: 09/25/17 | Circulation Deadline: 03/26/18 | Signatures Required: 585,407 - (25% of Signatures Reached 01/05/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Alexander E. Creel c/o Christopher C. Carlisle (916) 492-5200

Removes the following current requirements for homeowners who are over 55 years old or severely disabled to transfer their property tax base to a replacement residence: that replacement property be of equal or lesser value, replacement residence be in specific county, and the transfer occur only once. Removes similar replacement-value and location requirements on transfers for contaminated or disaster-destroyed property. Requires adjustments to the replacement property’s tax base, based on the new property’s value. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Annual property tax losses for cities, counties, and special districts of around $150 million in the near term, growing over time to $1 billion or more per year (in today’s dollars). Annual property tax losses for schools of around $150 million per year in the near term, growing over time to $1 billion or more per year (in today’s dollars). Increase in state costs for schools of an equivalent amount in most years. (17-0013.)

1810. (17-0014A1)
Authorizes State Regulation of Kidney Dialysis Clinics. Limits Charges for Patient Care. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/13/17 | Circulation Deadline: 04/11/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 11/22/2017 (PDF))
Proponents: Edward Howard and Benjamen Tracey c/o BJ Chisholm (415) 421-7151 bchisholm@altber.com

Limits amounts outpatient kidney dialysis clinics may charge for patient care and imposes penalties for excessive charges. Requires annual reporting to the state regarding clinic costs, patient charges, and revenue. Prohibits clinics from discriminating against patients based on the source of payment for care. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State administrative costs of around $1 million annually to be covered by increases in license fees on chronic dialysis clinics. State and local government savings largely associated with reduced government employee and retiree health benefits spending on dialysis treatment, potentially up to tens of millions of dollars annually. (17-0014.)

1814. (17-0018A1)
Division of California into Three States. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/24/17 | Circulation Deadline: 04/23/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 12/21/2017 (PDF))
Proponents: Timothy Draper (650) 233-9000 tim@draper.com

Divides California into three states subject to approval by Congress. Assigns each county to a new state. Upon passage, directs Governor to request that Congress grant approval within twelve months. If Congress approves, directs Legislature to divide California’s assets and liabilities between the new states. Provides that, if Legislature fails to act within twelve months of Congressional approval, debts shall be distributed among new states based on population relative to California population as a whole, and assets within boundaries of each new state shall become the assets of that new state. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Assuming this measure is approved by voters and the federal government and allowed by the courts, all tax collections and spending by the existing State of California would end. California’s existing state assets and liabilities would be divided among three new states. These states would make their own decisions about state and local taxes and spending. (17-0018.)

1821. (17-0024)
Decriminalization of Psilocybin. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 10/31/17 | Circulation Deadline: 04/30/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 01/23/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Kevin P. Saunders and Dimitric Merchant (831) 521-1469

Decriminalize use, possession, sale, transport, or cultivation of psilocybin (a hallucinogenic compound) by persons at least 21 years of age. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs, not likely to exceed a few million dollars annually, to state and local governments related to enforcing psilocybin related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain psilocybin offenders. Potential increase in state and local tax revenues, not likely to exceed a couple million dollars annually, related to the production and sale of psilocybin. (17-0024.)

1823. (17-0026)
Establishes New Standards for Confinement of Certain Farm Animals; Bans Sale of Certain Non-Complying Products. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/02/17 | Circulation Deadline: 05/01/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/22/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Cheri Shankar c/o Kurt Oneto (916) 446-6752

Establishes new minimum space requirements for confining veal calves, breeding pigs, and egg-laying hens; requires egg-laying hens be raised in cage-free environment after December 31, 2021. Prohibits certain commercial sales of specified meat and egg products from animals confined in non-complying manner. Defines sales violations as unfair competition. Creates good faith defense for sellers relying upon written certification by suppliers that meat or animal products comply with new confinement standards. Requires State of California to issue implementing regulations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential decrease in state and local tax revenues from farm businesses, likely not to exceed the low millions of dollars annually. Potential state costs ranging up to ten million dollars annually to enforce the measure. (17-0026.)

1830. (17-0033A1)
Eliminates Recently Enacted Road Repair and Transportation Funding by Repealing Revenues Dedicated for those Purposes. Requires any Measure to Enact Certain Vehicle Fuel Taxes and Vehicle Fees be Submitted to and Approved by the Electorate. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 11/20/17 | Circulation Deadline: 05/21/18 | Signatures Required: 585,407 - (25% of Signatures Reached 12/15/2017 (PDF))
Thomas W. Hiltachk (916) 442-7757

Repeals a 2017 transportation law’s tax and fee provisions that pay for repairs and improvements to local roads, state highways, and public transportation. Requires the Legislature to submit any measure enacting specified taxes or fees on gas or diesel fuel, or on the privilege to operate a vehicle on public highways, to the electorate for approval. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced annual state transportation tax revenues of $2.9 billion in 2018-19, increasing to $4.9 billion annually by 2020-21. These revenues would primarily have supported state highway maintenance and rehabilitation, local streets and roads, and mass transit. In addition, potentially lower transportation tax revenues in the future from requiring voter approval of such tax increases, with the impact dependent on future actions by the Legislature and voters. (17-0033.)

1836. (17-0039, Amdt.#1)
Establishes New Consumer Privacy Rights; Expands Liability for Consumer Data Breaches. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/18/17 | Circulation Deadline: 06/18/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/06/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Mary Ross and Alastair Mactaggart c/o James C. Harrison (510) 346-6200

Gives consumers right to learn categories of personal information that businesses collect, sell, or disclose about them, and to whom information is sold or disclosed. Gives consumers right to prevent businesses from selling or disclosing their personal information. Prohibits businesses from discriminating against consumers who exercise these rights. Allows consumers to sue businesses for security breaches of consumers’ data, even if consumers cannot prove injury. Allows for enforcement by consumers, whistleblowers, or public agencies. Imposes civil penalties. Applies to online and brick-and-mortar businesses that meet specific criteria. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased costs, potentially reaching the low tens of millions of dollars annually, to state and local governments from implementing and enforcing the measure, some or all of which would be offset by increased penalty revenue or settlement proceeds authorized by the measure. Unknown impact on state and local tax revenues due to economic effects resulting from new requirements on businesses to protect consumer information. (17-0039.)

1839. (17-0043, Amdt.#1)
Requires Private-Sector Emergency Ambulance Employees to Remain on Call During Work Breaks. Changes Other Conditions of Employment. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/29/17 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 01/31/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Sean Henschel c/o Kurt Oneto (916) 446-6752

Makes the labor law that entitles hourly employees to take work (meal and rest) breaks without being on call inapplicable to private-sector emergency ambulance employees. Regulates timing of meal breaks for these employees. Exempts employers from potential liability for violations of existing law regarding work breaks. Requires employers to pay for employees to be trained regarding certain emergency incidents, violence prevention, and mental health and wellness. Requires employers to provide employees with certain mental-health services. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Local government net savings likely in the tens of millions of dollars annually due to lower emergency ambulance contract costs. (17-0043.)

1840. (17-0044, Amdt.#1)
Restricts Parole for Non-Violent Offenders. Authorizes Felony Sentences for Certain Offenses Currently Treated Only as Misdemeanors. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 01/04/18 | Circulation Deadline: 07/03/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/07/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Nina Salarno Besselman c/o Charles H. Bell, Jr. (916) 442-7757 cbell@bmhlaw.com

Imposes restrictions on parole program for non-violent offenders who have completed the full term for their primary offense. Expands list of offenses that disqualify an inmate from this parole program. Changes standards and requirements governing parole decisions under this program. Authorizes felony charges for specified theft crimes currently chargeable only as misdemeanors, including some theft crimes where the value is between $250 and $950. Requires persons convicted of specified misdemeanors to submit to collection of DNA samples for state database. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased state and local correctional costs likely in the tens of millions of dollars annually, primarily related to increases in penalties for certain theft-related crimes and the changes to the nonviolent offender release consideration process. Increased state and local court-related costs of around a few million dollars annually related to processing probation revocations and additional felony theft filings. Increased state and local law enforcement costs not likely to exceed a couple million dollars annually related to collecting and processing DNA samples from additional offenders. (17-0044.)

1841. (17-0045, Amdt.#1)
Authorizes Bonds Funding Construction at Hospitals Providing Children’s Health Care. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 01/16/18 | Circulation Deadline: 07/16/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/14/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Ann-Louise Kuhns; (916) 552-7111

Authorizes $1.5 billion in bonds, to be repaid from state’s General Fund, to fund grants for construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of qualifying children’s hospitals. Designates 72 percent of funds to qualifying private nonprofit hospitals providing comprehensive services to high volumes of children eligible for governmental programs and children with special health needs eligible for the California Children’s Services program, 18 percent of funds to University of California general acute care children’s hospitals, and 10 percent of funds to public and private nonprofit hospitals providing services to children eligible for the California Children’s Services program. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State costs of $2.9 billion to pay off principal ($1.5 billion) and interest ($1.4 billion) on bonds over a 35-year period. Annual payments would average $84 million. Annual payments would be lower than this average in the initial and final few years, and somewhat higher in the intervening years. (17-0045.)

1845. (17-0049, Amdt.#1)
Eliminates Certain Liability for Lead-Paint Manufacturers. Authorizes Bonds to Fund Structural and Environmental Remediation Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 01/26/18 | Circulation Deadline: 07/25/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/22/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Randy Perry c/o Kurt Oneto (916) 446-6752

Declares that lead paint in homes is not a public nuisance. Eliminates liability of lead-paint manufacturers—in cases pending on or after November 1, 2017—for claims that lead paint in homes causes a public nuisance. Authorizes $2 billion in state general obligation bonds to fund grants for certain structural and environmental remediation projects as follows: $1.5 billion for certain residential units; $400 million for schools; and $100 million for senior housing facilities. Appropriates money from the General Fund to repay bonds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $3.9 billion to pay off principal ($2 billion) and interest ($1.9 billion) on bonds over a period of 35 years. Annual payments would average $110 million, with payments lower in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Reduction of several hundred million dollars or more in funding for local programs to clean up lead-based paint in homes. (17-0049.)