Initiatives and Referenda Cleared for Circulation

The Attorney General prepares a circulating title and summary of the chief purpose and points of a proposed initiative measure. Proposed initiative measures are cleared for circulation on the day the circulating title and summary is sent to the initiative proponent(s). No petition may be circulated for signatures before it has been cleared to do so by the Attorney General.

Please note: Counties have 8 working days after a proposed initiative measure's circulation deadline (Elections Code section 9030 (b)) to notify the Secretary of State's Office if any petition signatures were received. If no signatures are submitted, a proposed initiative measure will fail on the 9th working day after its circulation deadline.

1729. (15-0068A2)
Campaign Finance. Donor Disclosure. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute.
Summary Date: 11/20/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 05/18/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407 (25% of Signatures Reached 02/09/2016)
Jim Heerwagen c/o Gary Winuk (916) 446-2300

Creates a constitutional right to public disclosure of money used to finance campaign activity and influence government actions. Requires corporations and nonprofit organizations that spend $50,000 or more on political activities in California to disclose their $10,000 donors, including where donations passed through other entities. Requires that a political campaign’s advertisements disclose its top three donors contributing $50,000 or more. Expands Secretary of State’s online campaign finance database. Extends bar against former legislators lobbying Legislature or state agencies to 24 months. Requires disclosure of lobbying for government contracts. Increases penalties for Political Reform Act violations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased costs to state and local governments to administer state campaign finance and disclosure laws. These costs include (1) one-time costs—possibly tens of millions of dollars—to state and local governments to develop new information technology systems and (2) ongoing costs to state and local governments of possibly millions of dollars each year. These costs would be offset to some extent by higher fines. (15-0068.) (Full Text)

1730. (15-0069)
Medical Marijuana. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 11/25/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 05/23/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Roger D. Morgan, Scott Chipman, Carla Lowe, and Ron Allen (916) 434-5629 rogermorgan339@gmail.com

Bans all privately owned medical marijuana cultivation sites and dispensaries. Creates state-owned/operated dispensaries, and a single state-owned/operated site for medical marijuana cultivation, testing, and processing. Allows local governments to ban or restrict the number and location of state-owned dispensaries. Establishes packaging, lab testing, and potency standards for medical marijuana. Sets minimum age for medical marijuana use, at 21. Requires adoption of strict standards to govern physician medical marijuana recommendations for their patients. Specifies marijuana blood-content levels that establish driving under the influence. Retains current prohibition on recreational use of marijuana. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown change in state and local revenues related to sales of medical marijuana depending on how the measure is implemented by the state. Increased state costs of millions to tens of millions of dollars annually to implement a program to educate K-12 students and their teachers and parents regarding marijuana use. (15-0069.) (Full Text)

1731. (15-0070A1)
Tax to Fund Education, Healthcare, and Child Development. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 11/25/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 05/23/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Cass Trinidad Gualvez and Dietmar Grellman c/o Barry Fadem (925) 283-0581 bfadem1@aol.com

Permanently establishes the temporary personal income tax increases enacted in 2012 for annual earnings over $290,000, currently set to expire in 2018. Imposes new personal income tax on annual earnings over $1 million. Allocates these tax revenues 50% to K-12 education, community colleges, and universities; 40% to healthcare for low-income individuals; and 10% to childcare and child development programs. Excludes these revenues from Proposition 98 funding requirements. Establishes a reserve fund, capped at 20% of the annual revenues, for use during state budget emergencies. Requires annual audit of expenditures. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased state revenues annually beginning in 2019—likely in the $7 billion to $15 billion range initially—with amounts varying based on stock market and economic trends. These revenues generally would be spent on education and health programs, with a small portion deposited annually to a reserve fund. (15-0070.) (Full Text)

1732. (15-0072)
Constitutional Definition of a Person. Fertilized Human Eggs. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/07/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Walter B. Hoye II and Lori Hoye civilrights@civilrightsfoundation.org (510) 225-4056

Extends constitutional protections of due process and equal protection to all fertilized human eggs by redefining “person” as including each and every human organism from the commencement of biological development. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potentially significant net costs to state and local governments from the establishment of due process and equal protection rights for zygotes, embryos, and fetuses. (15-0072.) (Full Text)

1733. (15-0073)
Speech. Holocaust Denial Restrictions. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/07/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gregory Foulkes (949) 973-0975 grefou@gmail.com

Restricts speech that lobbies against the recognition of the Jewish, Armenian, or Ukrainian Holocausts at any school, educational institution, or museum that receives state funds. Prevents Holocaust denial organizations, as defined, from disseminating information and conducting activities on the premises of these institutions, or involving the employees, clients, or students of these institutions. Permits injunctive relief and damages against the Holocaust denial organizations that commit violations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Given its restraint on free speech, a court may find this measure unconstitutional. If so, it would have no fiscal effect. If the measure could be implemented legally, the annual cost to state-funded educational institutions is unlikely to be significant statewide, but the cost for a particular local government in a particular year might be significant if it is sued and found to have violated the provisions of the measure. (15-0073.) (Full Text)

1735. (15-0075A1)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Dale Sky Jones and Alice A. Huffman (510) 251-1544

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Creates office and commission to license and regulate marijuana industry. Imposes state taxes of $2 per square foot of marijuana cultivation, $1 to $15 per ounce of marijuana production, 10% of retail sales price for edible marijuana products and concentrated extracts, and 5% for other retail sales. Imposes additional 5% local tax on retail sales. Exempts medical marijuana from some taxation. Provides for collection of taxes by State Board of Equalization. Authorizes resentencing and destruction of records for prior marijuana convictions. Allows limited local regulation of marijuana. Eases state restrictions on industrial hemp farming. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Additional state and local tax revenues potentially ranging from the high hundreds of millions of dollars to over $1 billion annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, most of which would be required to be spent for specific purposes such as education, environmental protection, marijuana-related research, and substance use treatment. (15-0075.) (Full Text)

1736. (15-0078A1)
Public School Teachers. Waiting Period for Permanent Status. School Employment Decisions. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Heidi L. Gallegos and Stephen J. Cox (209) 954-9001

Increases length of service required before a teacher may become a permanent employee, from two consecutive school years to five consecutive school years. Gives local public school boards sole authority to set policies for, and ends collective bargaining over, teacher transfers, reassignments, layoffs, or re-employment, and the start date of the school year and hours in the school day. Prohibits seniority as a primary consideration in such policy decisions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Local educational agencies (LEAs) likely would experience net higher costs in the low tens of millions of dollars statewide due to conducting more frequent teacher evaluations and having to modify their employment policies. LEAs might incur various other fiscal effects relating to teacher compensation, teacher turnover, collective bargaining, and employment hearings, but the net impact of all these factors is difficult to determine. (15-0078.) (Full Text)

1737. (15-0079A1)
Public School Teachers. Waiting Period for Permanent Status. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Heidi L. Gallegos and Stephen J. Cox (209) 954-9001

Increases length of service required before a teacher may become a permanent employee, from two consecutive school years to five consecutive school years. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Local educational agencies (LEAs) likely would experience net higher costs in the low tens of millions of dollars statewide due to conducting more frequent teacher evaluations. LEAs might incur various other fiscal effects relating to teacher compensation, teacher turnover, and dismissal hearings, but the net impact of all these factors is difficult to determine. (15-0079.) (Full Text)

1738. (15-0076A1)
Public Employees. Pension and Retiree Healthcare Benefits. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Chuck Reed, Stephanie Gomes, Carl DeMaio, Pat Moris, Bill Kampe, and Tom Tait (415) 732-7700

Amends California Constitution to impose restrictions on pension and retiree healthcare benefits for new public employees, including those working in K-12 schools, higher education, hospitals, and police protection. Bars government employers from enrolling public employees hired after January 1, 2019 in defined benefit pension plans, from enhancing certain retirement benefits for such employees, and from paying more than one-half cost of such employees’ pension and retiree healthcare benefits, unless first approved by voters. Limits retirement boards’ ability to place financial conditions upon government employers that close defined benefit plans to new employees. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Significant effects—savings and costs—on state and local governments relating to compensation for governmental employees. The magnitude and timing of these effects would depend heavily on future decisions made by voters, governmental employers, the Legislature, Governor, and the courts. (15-0076.) (Full Text)

1739. (15-0077A1)
Public Employees. Pension and Retiree Healthcare Benefits. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/09/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/06/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Chuck Reed, Stephanie Gomes, Carl DeMaio, Pat Moris, Bill Kampe, and Tom Tait (415) 732-7700

Amends California Constitution to impose restrictions on employer contributions toward cost of pension and retiree healthcare benefits for new public employees, including those working in K-12 schools, higher education, hospitals, and police protection. Bars government employers from contributing amount more than 11% of an employee’s base compensation (13% for safety employees) toward cost of pension and retiree healthcare benefits for public employees hired after January 1, 2019, and from paying more than one-half cost of such new public employees’ pension and retiree healthcare benefits, unless higher portion is first approved by voters. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Significant effects—savings and costs—on state and local governments relating to compensation for governmental employees. The magnitude and timing of these effects would depend heavily on future decisions made by voters, governmental employers, the Legislature, Governor, and the courts. (15-0077.) (Full Text)

1740. (15-0082A2)
Sports-Based Markets. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 12/15/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/13/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Zack Ward (705) 772-7066 system@thenewsportseconomy.com

Establishes right for any California resident, 18 years or older, to trade on responsible, carefully regulated, non-gambling, and socially beneficial sports markets. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown fiscal impact on state and local governments depending on how the measure is interpreted and implemented. (15-0082.) (Full Text)

1743. (15-0084A1)
Three Strikes Law. Pre-1994 Strikes. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/17/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/14/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Julie A. Piccolotti

Provides that serious or violent felonies committed before passage of the three strikes law in 1994 do not count as strikes toward three strikes sentencing. Drops definition of crimes that count as strikes for purpose of three strikes law. Requires resentencing for certain three strikes inmates (and certain two strikes inmates) who committed pre-1994 serious and/or violent felonies. Applies savings from sentencing changes to low-income middle and high schools, California Community Colleges, University of California, and prison rehabilitation programs. Removes crime of criminal threats from list of serious felonies that may not be plea-bargained. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net state criminal justice system savings that could be up to several hundred million dollars annually in the first few years following its implementation and up to the low hundreds of millions of dollars annually thereafter. These savings would be spent on high poverty middle and high schools, tuition reduction at institutions of higher education, and prison rehabilitation programs. Increased county costs that could reach into the low tens of millions of dollars annually, primarily due to increased county jail and community supervision operations. (15-0084.) (Full Text)

1744. (15-0085A1)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/22/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/20/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Editte Dalya Lerman, David Nick, Omar Figueroa, Dave Hodges, John W. Lee, Michael Grafton, Archie Hinkle, Degé Coutee, Elihu Hernandez, Steve Kubby, A. Jon Martinelli, Lanette M. Davies, Craig Beresh, Deborah Tharp, Dona Frank, Jason W. Bennett, Gilbert E. Canedo, Denise Dorey, Russell Goodrow, Gregory Charles Ledbetter, Gregory F. Fuentes, Sandra Bacon Tercero, Shona Levana Gochenaur, Richard Miller, Jason Browne, Ron E. Mullins, c/o John Lee john@afpr.us

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Creates commission to regulate and license marijuana industry. Applies general retail sales taxes to marijuana, unless medical or dietary exemptions apply. Permits excise taxes on certain marijuana sales, up to 15% of retail price, and storage, up to 10% of wholesale price. Prohibits discrimination based on marijuana use. Restricts marijuana testing for job applicants and employees, or penalizing employees for off-duty use, unless they are in safety-sensitive occupations. Permits local regulation of marijuana businesses, including ban or limit on number with voter approval. Exempts medical marijuana collectives from licensing requirements. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, most of which would be required to be spent for specific purposes such as education, public safety, and drug abuse education and treatment. (15-0085.) (Full Text)

1745. (15-0086A1)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/22/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/20/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Editte Dalya Lerman, Dave Hodges, Michael Grafton, Steve Kubby, Ron E. Mullins, David Nick, John W. Lee, Russell Goodrow, Richard Miller, c/o John Lee john@afpr.us

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Creates commission to regulate and license marijuana industry. Applies general retail sales taxes to marijuana, unless medical or dietary exemptions apply. Permits excise tax on marijuana, up to 12% of retail price. Permits local governments to ban or limit the number of marijuana businesses within their boundaries if their voters approve. Requires each county sheriff to establish marijuana-specific diversion programs for marijuana offenders. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Net reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, a portion of which would be required to be spent for specific purposes such as education, public safety, and drug abuse education and treatment. (15-0086.) (Full Text)

1746. (15-0087)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/22/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/20/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Editte Dalya Lerman, Dave Hodges, Michael Grafton, Steve Kubby, Ron E. Mullins, David Nick, Russell Goodrow, Richard Miller, c/o John Lee john@afpr.us

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Applies general retail sales taxes to non-medical marijuana. Permits Legislature to place additional excise tax on non-medical marijuana sales, up to 15% of retail price. Permits local governments to ban or limit the number of marijuana businesses within their boundaries if their voters approve. Requires State to create and fund diversion programs in each county exclusively for marijuana offenders. Requires Legislature to pass laws implementing the initiative by January 1, 2018. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana. (15-0087.) (Full Text)

1748. (15-0088A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $4.92 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; water recycling and desalination; capturing urban runoff; flood management; water for wildlife; water conservation; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $9.8 billion to pay off principal ($4.9 billion) and interest ($4.9 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $250 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0088.) (Full Text)

1749. (15-0089A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $4.92 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; water recycling and desalination; capturing urban runoff; flood management; water for wildlife; water conservation; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $9.8 billion to pay off principal ($4.9 billion) and interest ($4.9 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $250 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0089.) (Full Text)

1750. (15-0090A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $4.92 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; water recycling and desalination; capturing urban runoff; flood management; water for wildlife; water conservation; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $9.8 billion to pay off principal ($4.9 billion) and interest ($4.9 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $250 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0090.) (Full Text)

1751. (15-0091A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $4.92 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; water recycling and desalination; capturing urban runoff; flood management; water for wildlife; water conservation; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $9.8 billion to pay off principal ($4.9 billion) and interest ($4.9 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $250 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0091.) (Full Text)

1752. (15-0092A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $6.02 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; capturing urban runoff; water recycling and desalination; flood management; water conservation; water for wildlife; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $12 billion to pay off principal ($6 billion) and interest ($6 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $300 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0092.) (Full Text)

1753. (15-0093A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $6.02 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; capturing urban runoff; water recycling and desalination; flood management; water conservation; water for wildlife; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $12 billion to pay off principal ($6 billion) and interest ($6 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $300 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0093.) (Full Text)

1754. (15-0094A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $6.02 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; capturing urban runoff; water recycling and desalination; flood management; water conservation; water for wildlife; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $12 billion to pay off principal ($6 billion) and interest ($6 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $300 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0094.) (Full Text)

1755. (15-0095A1)
Water Bond. Funding for Water Quality, Supply, Recycling, and Storage Projects. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 12/28/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/27/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Gerald Meral c/o Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Authorizes $6.02 billion in general obligation bonds for water supply infrastructure projects, including watershed improvement and water quality enhancement; capturing urban runoff; water recycling and desalination; flood management; water conservation; water for wildlife; groundwater sustainability and storage; and safe drinking water. Appropriates money from the General Fund to pay off bonds. Requires certain projects to provide matching funds from non-state sources in order to receive bond funds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $12 billion to pay off principal ($6 billion) and interest ($6 billion) on bonds over a 40-year period. Annual payments would average $300 million. Annual payments would be relatively low in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Savings to local governments on water-related projects that would likely average between a few tens of millions of dollars and over $100 million annually over the next few decades. (15-0095.) (Full Text)

1757. (15-0097)
Campaign Finance. Donor Disclosure. Initiative Statute.  
Summary Date: 12/31/2015 | Circulation Deadline: 06/28/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880 (25% of Signatures Reached 03/17/2016)
John Cox (847) 274-8814

Requires committees controlled by a candidate for the Legislature or other elected state office to disclose their top 10 donors in all committee advertisements supporting the candidate or opposing the candidate’s opponents. Requires legislators and other elected state officers, when providing testimony or participating in any vote on state legislation, to display on their persons the identity of the top 10 donors to their controlled committees. Imposes criminal and civil sanctions for violations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Minor effects on state finances. (15-0097.) (Full Text)

1758. (15-0099A1) Undocumented Immigrants. State and Local Enforcement of Federal Immigration Law. Initiative Statute. Summary Date: 01/04/2016 | Circulation Deadline: 07/05/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880 Ted Hilton and Jerry Mailhot

Requires state and local agencies to report those believed to be undocumented immigrants in their custody to federal immigration authorities. Bars release of undocumented immigrant if federal immigration authorities request hold. Provides for designating state/local law enforcement officers to perform certain federal immigration officer duties. Prohibits state/local laws or policies that restrict state/local officials from assisting enforcement of federal immigration law. Authorizes civil penalties against agencies or officials that adopt or implement any state/local law or policy against assisting enforcement of federal immigration law. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased state and local law enforcement and corrections costs that could potentially reach several millions of dollars annually, a portion of which could be offset by the potential receipt of additional federal funds for law enforcement training. (15-0099.)(Full Text)

1763.(15-0104A1)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 01/07/16 | Circulation Deadline: 07/05/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
George W.M. Mull (415) 445-2149

Legalizes marijuana and hemp under state law. Designates State Board of Equalization and other state agencies to license and regulate marijuana industry. Applies general state retail sales tax to marijuana. Imposes additional state excise tax of 5% on retail sales of marijuana, to be collected by State Board of Equalization. Allows local taxes on retail sales up to 5%, and on annual cultivation up to $2 per square foot of plant canopy. Provides exemptions for medical marijuana and hemp. Allows local zoning regulations that do not ban retail sales or otherwise unreasonably restrict access to marijuana within the jurisdiction. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana, a portion of which would be required to be spent to reimburse state implementation costs and to benefit various programs including preschool education, environmental protection, and medical research. (15-0104.) (Full Text)

1765. (15-0106)
Sales Tax on Political Advertisements. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 01/13/16 | Circulation Deadline: 07/11/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Terrance Lynn contact@theterrylynn.com

Imposes a 1,000 percent sales tax on political advertising delivered within the State of California. Exempts from tax the first one million dollars in spending within a calendar year by a single entity or group of related entities. Political advertising includes, but is not limited to, all media spending by political parties, political action committees, or candidates. Requires that proceeds of the tax be used for public education. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown increase in state revenues to be provided to public educational entities, assuming that the measure goes into effect after voter approval, executive branch implementation decisions, and court challenges. (15-0106.) (Full Text)

1766. (15-0108A1)
Online Voting. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 01/19/16 | Circulation Deadline: 07/18/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Chase Martinez (916) 223-6976

Requires Secretary of State to develop or contract with a third party for an online voting system by December 31, 2017. Appropriates $45 million from the Voting Modernization Bond Act of 2002 to finance the new system. Contains security and auditing requirements. Requires testing of system in local elections. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased costs to state and local governments to administer elections. These costs include (1) one-time costs—possibly tens of millions of dollars—to develop new information technology systems and (2) ongoing costs—possibly millions of dollars annually—to administer elections. (15-0108.) (Full Text

1767. (15-0109A1)
High-Speed Rail. No Issuance or Sale of Future Bonds. Suspension of Project. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 01/25/16 | Circulation Deadline: 07/25/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Robert Huff and George Runner c/o Charles H. Bell (916) 442-7757

Prevents issuance and sale of remaining amount of high-speed rail bonds previously approved by voters to initiate construction of high-speed train system. Redirects unspent high-speed rail bond proceeds to any other purpose approved by voters in separate measure at same election, or, if none, to retiring outstanding high-speed rail bonds. Suspends high-speed rail project, except to study, using state general funds only, feasibility of completing full route from San Francisco to Los Angeles with Sacramento and San Diego connections. Establishes process for preserving project assets and retiring pre-existing obligations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State savings of up to about $700 million annually in debt-service costs, depending on the actual reduction in bond funds spent as a result of this measure. Other potential fiscal effects (such as changes in state spending and loss of federal funds), depending on whether the state continued to pursue a high-speed rail project in the future. (15-0109.) (Full Text

1768. (15-0110A1)
Disability Access Litigation. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 01/25/16 | Circulation Deadline: 07/25/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Andrew K. Rauch (619) 515-1140 rauch@rauchaplc.com

Requires that persons with disabilities who sue property owners or businesses for construction-related accessibility violations give 120 days notice before filing suit. Bars suit if the property owner or business corrects the violation within 120 days. Requires that notice of violations be provided in the same way as notice of a lawsuit. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential reduction in state court costs related to civil claims, which could be in the range of a few million dollars annually. (15-0110.) (Full Text

1769. (15-0107A1)
Water Bond. Reallocation of Bond Authority to Water Storage Projects. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute.
Summary Date: 01/25/16 | Circulation Deadline: 07/25/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407 (25% of Signatures Reached 03/18/2016)
Robert Huff and George Runner c/o Charles H. Bell (916) 442-7757

Prioritizes water uses in California, with domestic uses first and irrigation uses second, over environmental, recreational, and other beneficial uses. Reallocates up to $10.7 billion in unused bond authority from existing high-speed rail ($8.0 billion) and water storage ($2.7 billion) purposes, to fund water storage projects for domestic and irrigation uses. Removes requirement that water storage projects funded by the $2.7 billion amount also benefit the environment. Creates new State Water and Groundwater Storage Facilities Authority to choose the projects to be funded by reallocated bond amounts. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: No significant increase or decrease in the state’s anticipated debt payments from the redirection of up to $10.7 billion in bonds from previously approved measures, assuming these bonds would have been sold in the future absent this measure. Unknown net fiscal effects on state and local governments due to measure’s changes to how water is prioritized in the State Constitution, as well as potential changes to funding levels available for capital projects. (15-0107.) (Full Text)

1771. (15-0112)
Legislature. Secret Ballots. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 01/27/16 | Circulation Deadline: 07/25/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Subhendu Das subhendu.das@excite.com

Requires members of State Legislature to vote by secret ballot in all legislative decision-making. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential increase in state legislative costs, which would be funded within the existing constitutional budget limit for the Legislature. (15-0112.) (Full Text)

1772. (15-0113)
Disability Access Litigation. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 02/03/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/01/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Terry Rogers (562) 988-3106

Requires that persons with disabilities who sue property owners or businesses for accessibility violations give 90 days notice before filing suit. Bars suit if the property owner or business cures the violation within 90 days. Requires local permitting authorities to give priority to building permit applications submitted for purpose of making alterations or repairs to comply with accessibility laws. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential reduction in state court costs related to civil claims, which could be in the range of a few million dollars annually. (15-0113.) (Full Text)

1774. (15-0114A1)
Elimination of Charter Schools. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 02/08/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/08/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Diana Mansker (916) 391-3384

Repeals laws governing charter schools effective July 1, 2017. Requires charter schools to convert to traditional public schools or close, at local school districts’ discretion. Requires charter schools to return all unencumbered public funds to the state and to transfer all real property purchased with public funds to their local school districts. Authorizes state audits of school assets. Provides penalties for violations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: About $5 billion in state funding and operational costs would shift from charter schools to school districts. Ongoing facility costs also would shift from charter schools to school districts, with the exact effect depending upon the decisions made by state policymakers and districts. Transition costs totaling hundreds of millions of dollars statewide for school districts to dispose of charter school property, recruit and train staff, replace textbooks, determine appropriate instructional placements for incoming students, and repurpose facilities. (15-0114.) (Full Text)

1775. (15-0116A1)
Local Government. Water, Sewer, Stormwater, And Flood Control Services. Fee Structures. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 02/18/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/16/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Christopher McKenzie, Tim Quinn, Matthew Cate, c/o Lance H. Olson and Richard Miadich, (916) 442-2952

Establishes alternative process for local government to impose fees for water, sewer, stormwater, and flood control services, as defined, without voter approval. Authorizes fee structures that recover reasonable costs of providing service, encourage water conservation and resource management, and provide fee reductions for low-income households. Requires notice of and public hearing on proposed fees. Allows fee payers to prevent proposed fee by majority filing written protests. Prohibits use of fee revenues for other purposes. Requires independent audit of revenues and expenditures. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased local government revenues and spending for flood control services and stormwater management in the range of low hundreds of millions of dollars up to more than $1 billion annually, depending on future actions by local governing boards and voters. (15-0116.) (Full Text)

1776. (15-0117A1)
Vote by Mail Ballots. Electronic Submission. All-Mailed Ballot Elections. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 02/18/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/16/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Repeals prohibitions against voting systems connecting to Internet or using wireless communications. Establishes Election Data Security Commission, composed of Secretary of State and six subject matter experts, to develop standards, software, and procedures for secure electronic submission of vote by mail ballots. Directs Commission to conduct electronic submission pilot programs for military voters by November 2022; requires statewide use if Commission certifies security of system. Exempts Commission from conflict of interest laws, as specified; requires disclosure of financial interests in companies Commission contracts with. Expands county authority to conduct all-mailed ballot elections. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: One-time state costs—likely many tens of millions of dollars and possibly exceeding $100 million—to implement a new information technology system. Ongoing state costs to maintain system—possibly millions of dollars each year. Ongoing savings to counties for administering elections—possibly in the range of tens of millions of dollars for a statewide general election. (15-0117.) (Full Text)

1777. (15-0118A1)
Vote by Mail Ballots. Electronic Submission. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 02/18/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/16/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Lance H. Olson (916) 442-2952

Repeals prohibitions against voting systems connecting to Internet or using wireless communications. Establishes Election Data Security Commission, composed of Secretary of State and six subject matter experts, to develop standards, software, and procedures for secure electronic submission of vote by mail ballots. Directs Commission to conduct electronic submission pilot programs for military voters by November 2022; requires statewide use if Commission certifies security of system. Exempts Commission from conflict of interest laws, as specified; requires disclosure of financial interests in companies Commission contracts with. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: One-time state costs—likely many tens of millions of dollars and possibly exceeding $100 million—to implement a new information technology system. Ongoing state costs to maintain system—possibly millions of dollars each year. No significant fiscal effect on local governments. (15-0118.) (Full Text)

1778. (15-0119)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 02/23/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/22/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Dave Hodges, John Lee, and Michael Grafton john@afpr.us

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Applies general retail sales taxes to non-medical marijuana. Permits Legislature to place additional excise tax on non-medical marijuana sales, up to 15% of retail price. Permits local governments to ban or limit the number of marijuana businesses within their boundaries if their voters approve. Requires State to create and fund diversion programs in each county exclusively for marijuana offenders. Requires Legislature to pass laws implementing the initiative. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana. (15-0119.) (Full Text)

1779. (15-0120)
Marijuana Legalization. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 02/23/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/22/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Dave Hodges john@afpr.us

Legalizes marijuana under state law. Applies general retail sales taxes to non-medical marijuana. Permits Legislature to place additional excise tax on non-medical marijuana sales, up to 15% of retail price. Permits local governments to ban or limit the number of marijuana businesses within their boundaries if their voters approve. Requires State to create and fund diversion programs in each county exclusively for marijuana offenders. Requires Legislature to pass laws implementing the initiative. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced costs ranging from tens of millions of dollars to potentially exceeding $100 million annually to state and local governments related to enforcing certain marijuana-related offenses, handling the related criminal cases in the court system, and incarcerating and supervising certain marijuana offenders. Net additional state and local tax revenues of potentially up to several hundred million dollars annually related to the production and sale of marijuana. (15-0120.) (Full Text)

1780. (15-0122)
Nonpartisan Ballots. Initiative Constitutional Amendment and Statute.
Summary Date: 02/26/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/24/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Jesus Angel Cisneros c/o Bradley W. Hertz (818) 593-2949

Bars candidates for state elective office from listing their political party preference, or lack of political party preference, on the election ballot. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: No significant change in costs to state or local governments to administer elections. (15-0122.) (Full Text)

1782. (15-0123)
Healthcare Decision-Making. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 03/03/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/30/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Mitchell J. Pearce (408) 293-3883 drpearce@betterhealer.com

States that healthcare decisions for adults are their private decisions, and that healthcare decisions for minors are private decisions for their parents or legal guardians. Prohibits discrimination in areas of public rights and benefits, business services, or employment based on a person’s healthcare choices, unless person has certain illnesses, has lost his/her civil rights due to a criminal conviction, or has an addiction to any substance. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Highly uncertain fiscal effects on state and local governments, as these depend on how broadly the measure is interpreted by the courts. Potential fiscal effects could therefore range from minor to significant, but indeterminate, costs on state and local governments.(15-0123.) (Full Text)

1783. (15-0124)
Law Enforcement. Use of Excessive Force. Discrimination. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 03/03/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/30/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Glen Shaffer and Lisa Freedman Shaffer c/o Jeff Moore (408) 295-3394 info@sanjosenaacp.org

Establishes court process for designating a state or local law enforcement agency as an “over-policed jurisdiction” when the agency has shown a pattern of using excessive force or discrimination for at least twelve months. Subjects such agency to increased auditing, reporting, and drug testing requirements, monitoring by volunteer observers, loss of equipment, potential loss of State funding, mandatory use of body cameras, and other remedies ordered by court. Permits agency to petition court to remove designation after compliance with court order for at least one year. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential state court costs that could range in the millions of dollars annually related to hearing and processing cases filed under the measure and oversight of law enforcement agencies found to be over-policing. Potential state and local law enforcement costs that could be in the tens of millions of dollars annually primarily related to compliance with requirements placed on agencies found to be over-policing.(15-0124.) (Full Text)

1784. (15-0125A1)
State Legislature. Candidates and Officeholders. Rules and Procedures. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
Summary Date: 03/04/16 | Circulation Deadline: 08/31/16 | Signatures Required: 585,407
Robert Owen Bernstein (916) 487-0337

Requires legislators and legislative candidates take lie detector tests regarding residency and conduct while in office. Suspends legislators indicted for felonies from office without pay. Expands residency requirements and eliminates contractual and privacy rights for legislators. Repeals confidentiality provisions governing certain legislative proceedings and records. Prohibits legislators from receiving compensation from persons or businesses that have lobbied the Legislature within prior 48 months. Prohibits former legislators from lobbying Legislature or elected state officials for 12 years after leaving office. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential state costs of millions of dollars or more each year to administer lie detector tests. (15-0125.) (Full Text)

1785. (16-0001A1)
Environmental Health. Prohibited Substances and Activities. Vaccination. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 03/28/16 | Circulation Deadline: 09/26/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Cheriel Jensen (408) 379-0463 cherielj@earthlink.net

Prohibits genetically engineered plants and animals and over 300 listed substances from being introduced or released into the environment. Creates a new state entity to regulate environmental activities, modify or stop projects having pollution and radiation impacts, and test and approve substances before they are introduced into the environment. Prohibits treatment of water with fluoride or chlorine. Eliminates vaccination as a prerequisite for attendance at schools and daycare facilities. Provides criminal and civil liability for violations, with no statute of limitations. Fiscal impact: : It is the opinion of the Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance that the measure would result in a substantial net change in state and local finances. (16-0001.) (Full Text)

1786. (16-0002)
Initiative, Referendum, and Recall Petitions. Electronic Signature Gathering. Initiative Statute.
Summary Date: 04/06/16 | Circulation Deadline: 10/03/16 | Signatures Required: 365,880
Michael Freeman Liddell (530) 626-3440 drliddell@yahoo.com

Authorizes electronic signature gathering for state and local initiative, referendum, and recall petitions. Requires Secretary of State to develop a system that allows voters to view petitions on Secretary of State’s website and to sign them electronically directly on the website, or to download, print, and sign the printed petitions. Requires Secretary of State or local elections official to verify these signatures. Requires Secretary of State to invite arguments for and against petitions, and to post submitted arguments on website. Requires Secretary of State’s website to include ongoing tally of each measure’s signatures received electronically or on downloaded petitions. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: : One-time state and local government costs in the millions of dollars or more to develop an online system for electronic petition signature gathering. Potential net costs or savings due to changed state and local government processes for verifying petition signatures. (16-0002.) (Full Text)

 

 

*Elections Code section 9034 requires that once proponent(s) of a proposed initiative measure have gathered 25% of the number of signatures required (currently 91,740 for an initiative statute and 146,352 for a constitutional amendment) proponent(s) must immediately certify that they have done so under penalty of perjury to the Secretary of State. 

Upon receipt of the certification, the Secretary of State must provide copies of the proposed initiative measure and the circulating title and summary to the Senate and the Assembly. Each house is required to assign the proposed initiative measure to its appropriate committees and hold joint public hearings, at least 131 days before the date of the election at which the measure is to be voted on. However, the Legislature cannot amend the proposed initiative measure or prevent it from appearing on the ballot.