Initiatives and Referenda Pending Signature Verification

Once the requisite number of signatures has been collected, the petitions must be filed with the appropriate county elections official(s). Counties then have eight working days to report the raw count of signatures to the Secretary of State.

If the raw count of signatures equals 100% or more of the total number of signatures needed to qualify the initiative or referendum measure, the Secretary of State notifies the county elections officials that they will have to randomly sample signatures for validation, to ensure petitions were signed by registered voters. If the result of the random sample indicates that the number of valid signatures represents between 95% and 110% of the required number of signatures to qualify the initiative or referendum measure for the ballot, the Secretary of State directs the county elections officials to verify every signature on the petition. This process is referred to as a full check of signatures. If the total number of valid signatures is less than 95% of the number of signatures required to qualify the initiative or referendum measure, the proposed measure will fail to qualify for the ballot. For an initiative measure, if the number of valid signatures is greater than 110% of the required number of signatures, the initiative measure will be eligible for the ballot. Eligible initiative measures will become qualified for the ballot on the 131st day prior to the next statewide general election unless withdrawn by the proponent(s) prior to its qualification by the Secretary of State. For a proposed referendum measure, if the number of valid signatures is greater than 110% of the required number of signatures, the referendum measure is considered qualified without further verification. A referendum can qualify up to 31 days prior to a statewide general election. Spreadsheets containing the progress of a proposed initiative or referendum measure in the signature verification stage are updated regularly.

 

Random Sample

 

1810. (17-0014A1)
Authorizes State Regulation of Kidney Dialysis Clinics. Limits Charges for Patient Care. Initiative Statute. - (Random Sample Count 5/25/2018 (PDF))
Summary Date: 10/13/17 | Random Sample Deadline: 05/31/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 11/22/2017 (PDF))
Proponents: Edward Howard and Benjamen Tracey c/o BJ Chisholm (415) 421-7151 bchisholm@altber.com

Limits amounts outpatient kidney dialysis clinics may charge for patient care and imposes penalties for excessive charges. Requires annual reporting to the state regarding clinic costs, patient charges, and revenue. Prohibits clinics from discriminating against patients based on the source of payment for care. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State administrative costs of around $1 million annually to be covered by increases in license fees on chronic dialysis clinics. State and local government savings largely associated with reduced government employee and retiree health benefits spending on dialysis treatment, potentially up to tens of millions of dollars annually. (17-0014.)

1814. (17-0018A1)
Division of California into Three States. Initiative Statute. - (Random Sample Count 5/24/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 10/24/17 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/13/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 12/21/2017 (PDF))
Proponents: Timothy Draper (650) 233-9000 tim@draper.com

Divides California into three states subject to approval by Congress. Assigns each county to a new state. Upon passage, directs Governor to request that Congress grant approval within twelve months. If Congress approves, directs Legislature to divide California’s assets and liabilities between the new states. Provides that, if Legislature fails to act within twelve months of Congressional approval, debts shall be distributed among new states based on population relative to California population as a whole, and assets within boundaries of each new state shall become the assets of that new state. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Assuming this measure is approved by voters and the federal government and allowed by the courts, all tax collections and spending by the existing State of California would end. California’s existing state assets and liabilities would be divided among three new states. These states would make their own decisions about state and local taxes and spending. (17-0018.)

1823. (17-0026)
Establishes New Standards for Confinement of Certain Farm Animals; Bans Sale of Certain Non-Complying Products. Initiative Statute. (Random Sample Count 5/25/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 11/02/17 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/22/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 -  - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/22/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Cheri Shankar c/o Kurt Oneto (916) 446-6752

Establishes new minimum space requirements for confining veal calves, breeding pigs, and egg-laying hens; requires egg-laying hens be raised in cage-free environment after December 31, 2021. Prohibits certain commercial sales of specified meat and egg products from animals confined in non-complying manner. Defines sales violations as unfair competition. Creates good faith defense for sellers relying upon written certification by suppliers that meat or animal products comply with new confinement standards. Requires State of California to issue implementing regulations. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Potential decrease in state and local tax revenues from farm businesses, likely not to exceed the low millions of dollars annually. Potential state costs ranging up to ten million dollars annually to enforce the measure. (17-0026.)

1830. (17-0033A1)
Eliminates Recently Enacted Road Repair and Transportation Funding by Repealing Revenues Dedicated for those Purposes. Requires any Measure to Enact Certain Vehicle Fuel Taxes and Vehicle Fees be Submitted to and Approved by the Electorate. Initiative Constitutional Amendment. 
(Random Sample Count 5/25/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 11/20/17 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/25/18 | Signatures Required: 585,407 - (25% of Signatures Reached 12/15/2017 (PDF))
Proponents: Thomas W. Hiltachk (916) 442-7757

Repeals a 2017 transportation law’s tax and fee provisions that pay for repairs and improvements to local roads, state highways, and public transportation. Requires the Legislature to submit any measure enacting specified taxes or fees on gas or diesel fuel, or on the privilege to operate a vehicle on public highways, to the electorate for approval. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Reduced annual state transportation tax revenues of $2.9 billion in 2018-19, increasing to $4.9 billion annually by 2020-21. These revenues would primarily have supported state highway maintenance and rehabilitation, local streets and roads, and mass transit. In addition, potentially lower transportation tax revenues in the future from requiring voter approval of such tax increases, with the impact dependent on future actions by the Legislature and voters. (17-0033.)

1836. (17-0039, Amdt.#1)
Establishes New Consumer Privacy Rights; Expands Liability for Consumer Data Breaches. Initiative Statute.
 - (Random Sample Count 5/24/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 12/18/17 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/25/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/06/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Mary Ross and Alastair Mactaggart c/o James C. Harrison (510) 346-6200

Gives consumers right to learn categories of personal information that businesses collect, sell, or disclose about them, and to whom information is sold or disclosed. Gives consumers right to prevent businesses from selling or disclosing their personal information. Prohibits businesses from discriminating against consumers who exercise these rights. Allows consumers to sue businesses for security breaches of consumers’ data, even if consumers cannot prove injury. Allows for enforcement by consumers, whistleblowers, or public agencies. Imposes civil penalties. Applies to online and brick-and-mortar businesses that meet specific criteria. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Increased costs, potentially reaching the low tens of millions of dollars annually, to state and local governments from implementing and enforcing the measure, some or all of which would be offset by increased penalty revenue or settlement proceeds authorized by the measure. Unknown impact on state and local tax revenues due to economic effects resulting from new requirements on businesses to protect consumer information. (17-0039.)

1837. (17-0041)
Expands Local Governments’ Authority to Enact Rent Control on Residential Property. Initiative Statute. - (Random Sample Count 5/25/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 12/27/17 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/18/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/26/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Michael Weinstein, Elena Popp, and Christina Livingston c/o Fredric D. Woocher and Beverly Grossman Palmer fwoocher@strumwooch.com, bpalmer@strumwooch.com (310) 576-1233

Repeals state law that currently restricts the scope of rent-control policies that cities and other local jurisdictions may impose. Allows policies that would limit the rental rates that residential-property owners may charge for new tenants, new construction, and single-family homes. In accordance with California law, provides that rent-control policies may not violate landlords’ right to a fair financial return on their rental property. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Unknown, but potentially significant, changes in state and local government tax revenues. Net decrease more likely than net increase. Potential increase in local government costs of up to tens of millions of dollars per year in the long term, likely paid by fees on owners of rental housing. (17-0041.)

1839. (17-0043, Amdt.#1)
Requires Private-Sector Emergency Ambulance Employees to Remain on Call During Work Breaks. Changes Other Conditions of Employment. Initiative Statute. - 
(Random Sample Count 5/25/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 12/29/17 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/18/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 01/31/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Sean Henschel c/o Kurt Oneto (916) 446-6752

Makes the labor law that entitles hourly employees to take work (meal and rest) breaks without being on call inapplicable to private-sector emergency ambulance employees. Regulates timing of meal breaks for these employees. Exempts employers from potential liability for violations of existing law regarding work breaks. Requires employers to pay for employees to be trained regarding certain emergency incidents, violence prevention, and mental health and wellness. Requires employers to provide employees with certain mental-health services. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Local government net savings likely in the tens of millions of dollars annually due to lower emergency ambulance contract costs. (17-0043.)

1841. (17-0045, Amdt.#1)
Authorizes Bonds Funding Construction at Hospitals Providing Children’s Health Care. Initiative Statute.
 - (Random Sample Count 5/25/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 01/16/18 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/26/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/14/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Ann-Louise Kuhns; (916) 552-7111

Authorizes $1.5 billion in bonds, to be repaid from state’s General Fund, to fund grants for construction, expansion, renovation, and equipping of qualifying children’s hospitals. Designates 72 percent of funds to qualifying private nonprofit hospitals providing comprehensive services to high volumes of children eligible for governmental programs and children with special health needs eligible for the California Children’s Services program, 18 percent of funds to University of California general acute care children’s hospitals, and 10 percent of funds to public and private nonprofit hospitals providing services to children eligible for the California Children’s Services program. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State costs of $2.9 billion to pay off principal ($1.5 billion) and interest ($1.4 billion) on bonds over a 35-year period. Annual payments would average $84 million. Annual payments would be lower than this average in the initial and final few years, and somewhat higher in the intervening years. (17-0045.)

1845. (17-0049, Amdt.#1)
Eliminates Certain Liability for Lead-Paint Manufacturers. Authorizes Bonds to Fund Structural and Environmental Remediation Projects. Initiative Statute. (Random Sample Count 5/25/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 01/26/18 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/26/18 | Signatures Required: 365,880 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/22/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Randy Perry c/o Kurt Oneto (916) 446-6752

Declares that lead paint in homes is not a public nuisance. Eliminates liability of lead-paint manufacturers—in cases pending on or after November 1, 2017—for claims that lead paint in homes causes a public nuisance. Authorizes $2 billion in state general obligation bonds to fund grants for certain structural and environmental remediation projects as follows: $1.5 billion for certain residential units; $400 million for schools; and $100 million for senior housing facilities. Appropriates money from the General Fund to repay bonds. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: State General Fund costs of $3.9 billion to pay off principal ($2 billion) and interest ($1.9 billion) on bonds over a period of 35 years. Annual payments would average $110 million, with payments lower in the initial and final few years and somewhat higher in the intervening years. Reduction of several hundred million dollars or more in funding for local programs to clean up lead-based paint in homes. (17-0049.)

1846. (17-0050, Amdt.#1)
Expands Requirement for Supermajority Approval to Enact New Revenue Measures. Initiative Constitutional Amendment.
 - (Random Sample Count 5/25/2018(PDF))
Summary Date: 01/26/18 | Random Sample Deadline: 06/28/18 | Signatures Required: 585,407 - (25% of Signatures Reached 02/26/2018 (PDF))
Proponents: Robert Lapsley c/o Kurt Oneto (916) 446-6752

For new revenue measures, broadens definition of state taxes that would require approval by two-thirds supermajority vote of Legislature. For local governments, requires two-thirds approval of electorate to raise new taxes or governing body to raise new fees. Requires that state and local laws enacting new taxes specify how revenues can be spent. Heightens legal threshold for state and local governments to prove that fees passed without two-thirds approval are not taxes. Invalidates local taxes imposed in 2018, unless taxes meet criteria adopted by this measure. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of fiscal impact on state and local government: Likely minor decrease in annual state revenues and potentially substantial decrease in annual local revenues, depending upon future actions of the Legislature, local governing bodies, voters, and the courts. (17-0050.)


*Elections Code section 9034 requires that once proponent(s) of a proposed initiative measure have gathered 25% of the number of signatures required (currently 91,740 for an initiative statute and 146,352 for a constitutional amendment) proponent(s) must immediately certify that they have done so under penalty of perjury to the Secretary of State.